kode adsense disini
Hot Best Seller

The Year's Best Science Fiction: Eighteenth Annual Collection

Availability: Ready to download

The twenty-three stories in this collection imaginatively take us far across the universe, into the very core of our being, to the realm of the gods, and the moment just after now. Included here are the works of masters of the form and of bright new talents, including: Stephen Baxter, M.Shayne Bell, Rick Cook, Albert E. Cowdrey, Tananarive Due, Greg Egan, Eliot Fintushel, P The twenty-three stories in this collection imaginatively take us far across the universe, into the very core of our being, to the realm of the gods, and the moment just after now. Included here are the works of masters of the form and of bright new talents, including: Stephen Baxter, M.Shayne Bell, Rick Cook, Albert E. Cowdrey, Tananarive Due, Greg Egan, Eliot Fintushel, Peter F. Hamilton, Earnest Hogan, John Kessel, Nancy Kress, Ursula K. Le Guin, Paul J. McAuley, Ian McDonald, Susan Palwick, Severna Park, Alastair Reynolds, Lucius Shepard, Brian Stableford, Charles Stross, Michael Swanwick, Steven Utley, Robert Charles Wilson Supplementing the stories is the editor's insightful summation of the year's events and lengthy list of honorable mentions, making this book a valuable resource in addition to serving as the single best place in the universe to find stories that stir the imagination and the heart.


Compare
kode adsense disini

The twenty-three stories in this collection imaginatively take us far across the universe, into the very core of our being, to the realm of the gods, and the moment just after now. Included here are the works of masters of the form and of bright new talents, including: Stephen Baxter, M.Shayne Bell, Rick Cook, Albert E. Cowdrey, Tananarive Due, Greg Egan, Eliot Fintushel, P The twenty-three stories in this collection imaginatively take us far across the universe, into the very core of our being, to the realm of the gods, and the moment just after now. Included here are the works of masters of the form and of bright new talents, including: Stephen Baxter, M.Shayne Bell, Rick Cook, Albert E. Cowdrey, Tananarive Due, Greg Egan, Eliot Fintushel, Peter F. Hamilton, Earnest Hogan, John Kessel, Nancy Kress, Ursula K. Le Guin, Paul J. McAuley, Ian McDonald, Susan Palwick, Severna Park, Alastair Reynolds, Lucius Shepard, Brian Stableford, Charles Stross, Michael Swanwick, Steven Utley, Robert Charles Wilson Supplementing the stories is the editor's insightful summation of the year's events and lengthy list of honorable mentions, making this book a valuable resource in addition to serving as the single best place in the universe to find stories that stir the imagination and the heart.

30 review for The Year's Best Science Fiction: Eighteenth Annual Collection

  1. 4 out of 5

    Cindy

    99-cent buy from Goodwill. Keeping track of the stories I've read: 1 - John Kessel "The Juniper Tree" 2/5     Generations of feminist social & technological engineering on the moon with a horrifying murderous guilt twist. Fell flat for me. *27 - Charles Stross "Antibodies" 4/5     I find Stross's blog very amusing and well-written but had never read any of his fiction, despite him being a very prolific author. This story is one that starts out as a maybe-two-star and quickly turns into a 4 or 5 99-cent buy from Goodwill. Keeping track of the stories I've read: 1 - John Kessel "The Juniper Tree" 2/5     Generations of feminist social & technological engineering on the moon with a horrifying murderous guilt twist. Fell flat for me. *27 - Charles Stross "Antibodies" 4/5     I find Stross's blog very amusing and well-written but had never read any of his fiction, despite him being a very prolific author. This story is one that starts out as a maybe-two-star and quickly turns into a 4 or 5 star rating as the earth begins to fall out from under the feet of our protagonists. The beginning will remind you that this was written in 2000, but the end is mind blowing and amusing. Too much talking, though. 42 - Ursula K LeGuin "The Birthday of the World" 3/5     An alternative mythology story that's quite confusing to get into, mostly because the writing is obtuse. I like that God is a man and a woman joined, so you have God Himself and God Herself who are considered one, but have separate religious and ceremonial jobs. *64 - Nancy Kress "Savior" 5/5 Novella-length first contact story. An alien egg object lands in northern Minnesota. Humanity's interactions with the egg and humanity's own foibles spans many generations. A story of destruction and construction. Love the sociology SF of Kress. 549 - M. Shayne Bell "The Thing About Benny" 4/5     Entertaining riff in near future world where many plants are extinct and a young savant who hunts down lost specimens in old office buildings. Oh, and it's a clever Abba tribute. *555 - Robert Charles Wilson "The Long Goodbye" 5/5     A brisk 2.5 pages gives you two differentiated human species 350 years in the future, a grandfather and grandson, space exploration and a huge twist. Awesome! I love RCW.

  2. 4 out of 5

    pax

    It's hard to rate an anthology - I think the average mark for the stories (see below for individual comments, written as I read them) would not be a four. But the collection works as a whole, in its diversity. I need to remember, though, that this whole series is not a short story collection. It's mainly novellas, not even novelettes. Longer work that one should approach with different expectations. ***** *throws her hands up* OK, I give up. I'm gonna review this one story by story as it goes. Sinc It's hard to rate an anthology - I think the average mark for the stories (see below for individual comments, written as I read them) would not be a four. But the collection works as a whole, in its diversity. I need to remember, though, that this whole series is not a short story collection. It's mainly novellas, not even novelettes. Longer work that one should approach with different expectations. ***** *throws her hands up* OK, I give up. I'm gonna review this one story by story as it goes. Since my head insists on having opinions on each story and wanting to write them down: John Kessel: "The Juniper Tree" -- I dunno, I really dunno. It may have worked better as a novel with more time to actually develop the characters. The society is too unexplored for me (and yeah, too much a male perspective). Charles Stross: "Antibodies" -- oh, nice idea. Very nice. As always, Charlie's characters do not sparkle to me, but the story works and they are believable. And of course: the idea! Less the twist at the end, which was good, but more the basic idea. Oh! Ursula K. Le Guin: "The Birthday Of the World" -- almost more fantasy than science fiction (because of the prophecy - this one break the sf/fantasy wall), but oh, the perfect point of view, the world, the voice. And all the little things: how God's children are inbred without it ever being explicitly addressed. How the perspective changes from a child's view to that of a growing up woman. Nancy Kress: "Savior" -- Neat. Not wow. But very neat. Paul J. McAuley: "Reef" -- Space opera. With an interesting main character and working supporting roles, with very neat biology ideas and an interesting society structure. If you like space opera, this is yours. (I miss something that I can't put the finger on, but this may be because it's space opera and space opera is usually not mine.) Susan Palwick: "Going After Bobo" -- if this were a story by someone who does not usually write science fiction but writes literary fiction, they would not have labelled this one as sf. The future elements are tiny - the story was written in 2000 and I'm pretty sure all the technology was (almost) available back then already. I love literary and I like this story a lot, even though it's ends on a bit too positive a note with too many explanations. But it's quiet and sad and feels real. Albert E. Cowdrey: "Crux" -- Grah! Are we trying to be edgy? The usual time paradox story. With some more detailed torture, some more exotic location, some even younger whores, some even more stinky aliens. It's not that bad. It's just - come on, this story has been told so often! And with more impact. Severna Park: "The Cure For Everything" -- Dreamlike and just not what one would expect. Good, definitely good. (Also one of the shortest stories of the book, with 15 pages only. A true short story, why the others tend to be novella-like.) Peter F. Hamilton: "The Suspect Genome" -- Perhaps not a story I will remember in a few years time in detail, but a good strong one that pulls of three intersecting points of view and believable characters. Michael Swanwick: "The Raggle Taggle Gypsy-o" -- Thinking a bit more about it: I actually liked this one. Very short compared to all the others, but with a punch and just with enough glimpses into a world to make it work. Definitely fantasy, though, not high fantasy, but fantasy (which is what threw me off first, because this and therefore the punchline of the story was not what I *expected* in this collection - but for a fantasy story it works just perfectly). Lucius Shepard: "The Radiant Green Star" -- I liked the imagery and I loved, in parts, the language and the atmosphere created. Yet - somehow this story was lacking a heart. Also to me the setting did not seem really integral and this is something I need in a SF story. Or at least in this SF story. I mean, not a bad story per se, but also not one that would make me want to pick up more by the authors. Alastair Reynolds: "Great Wall of Mars" -- I liked this one. Now this story serves to quite a few of my reading kinks, particularly the hive-mind, the cold strong woman, and complex politics, so I may be a wee bit biased. It's also not a perfect story, but oh, one that definitely makes me want to read more. Enough to want to pick up at least some of the books set in the universe. Eliot Fintushel: "Milo and Sylvie" -- Sturgeon is indeed a good comparison and I do like Sturgeon's work, though this one is slightly uneven ... Brian Stableford: "Snowball In Hell" -- A bit preachy, but in a nice way. Really nicely done in the science part, even if not perfect in the execution. And, surprisingly, quite positive in the outlook. Stephen Baxter: "On the Orion Line" -- I read this one in some other collection (the military sf one? most likely - argh, how I hate it right now that my library is on the other side of the Atlantic) and neither remember it well enough to comment on it (which says something given how I read the military sf collection just a year ago; also here in Boston) nor remember liking it well enough to re-read it. Greg Egan: "Oracle" -- And there I am, thinking that maybe my taste changes; maybe the science fiction short story is not the perfect genre for me anymore, since so many of the stories fail to elicit real enthusiasm. And here comes Egan and writes this - clever and philosophical and real (there is Turing and there is Lewis, but not really, and the characters feel so incredibly real, so human) and yes, very, very hard when it comes to science. There is Goedel's conjecture and there are four-dimensional velocity vectors and there are rotations in complex spaces. And there is love and tragedy and meta-commentary on our own history. Just: yes, more of this please. Rick Coon and Ernest Hogan: "Obsidian Harvest" -- Another really fun one. Not super deep, but a fun, engaging read. I'd enjoy more of these! Tananarive Due: "Patient Zero" -- Not exactly bad, but neither inventive (I'm sure I've read this story more than once - and this was the most boring POV to tell it from), not especially good written. Charles Stross: "A Colder War" -- Huh. Charlie Stross writes a Lovecraftian story and I love it. Huh. Stranger things have happened, certainly, but this does not make this one not strange (I love Stross's blog, but his books so far rather underwhelmed; I much more prefer Greg Egan). Steven Utley: "The Real World" -- And another one that I read before, but did not remember in too much detail. It had a nice atmosphere, though, and was very character-driven, something I usually like. M. Shayne Bell: "The Thing About Benny" -- Most of the stories in this collection are not short stories, but rather novelettes and even novellas. This one is a short story. And a really good one. Robert Charles Wilson: "The Great Goodbye" -- micro-story with a really nice twist to it. Yay! More of those, please! Ian McDonald: "Tendeléo's Story" -- This is a slow going one, meditative almost. But also strong, honest, brutal. Deeply human. Deeply political. Deeply hopeful. (Though I feel mixed about the POV choice/changes, just needed to add that.)

  3. 4 out of 5

    Wealhtheow

    Most sf/f collections are made of mildly enjoyable but ultimately forgettable short stories. There are a few truly terrible stories in each, and even fewer truly good ones. I think the idea of short stories as The way to start getting noticed doesn't help (far too many people attempt a form they suck at), but the real problem seems to be editors who accept any old drek. The only editor whose anthologies I've 100% enjoyed thus far has been Sharyn November. Even John Joseph Adams and Ellen Datlow Most sf/f collections are made of mildly enjoyable but ultimately forgettable short stories. There are a few truly terrible stories in each, and even fewer truly good ones. I think the idea of short stories as The way to start getting noticed doesn't help (far too many people attempt a form they suck at), but the real problem seems to be editors who accept any old drek. The only editor whose anthologies I've 100% enjoyed thus far has been Sharyn November. Even John Joseph Adams and Ellen Datlow have included some memorable stinkers in this collections. But short story collections can give you fun-sized portions of stories, a tasting menu of various authors I've never heard of or never tried before, so I keep picking them up. To my pleasure, this is one of the best collections I've read in a while--nothing awful, and only a few stories too boring to read all the way through. The default in sf seems to be straight white American cis-dudes, so it was a pleasure to read so many stories with non-white, non-American, even non-dude protagonists. Set in alien-invaded-Nairobi, in nano-fueled-China, in a Vietnamese circus, on matriarchial-Mars, these are not your standard cookie-cutter settings and characters. And what a pleasure it was to read about them! My favorite story in the collection was probably "Tendeleo's Story" by Ian McDonald. Tendeleo Bi is a fantastic main character, strong, smart, devoted but with believable moments of childish self absorption, unapologetic and fierce. Her quest, first to save her village from the encroaching alien spores, then to create another home, kept me flipping through the pages. I was reading so fast I almost missed a major plot point! Susan Palwick's "Going After Bobo" is as poignant a portrait of a kid's search for his cat as any story I had to read in English class. Palwick gives us the story in bits and pieces, only revealing a snippet at a time, and it worked beautifully. Less sf than I expected, but well-told. Another favorite was "Obsidian Harvest" by Rick Cook and Ernest Hogan. Basically a classic private-eye story, but told in an alternate version of MesoAmerica where huetlacoatls live alongside humans. Our narrator, Tworabbit, aka Lucky, has been cast out of his noble family for some heinous crime, and now makes a living as a thug and investigator for a local crime boss. I hope this idea gets turned into something longer because I was intrigued by the world and the characters. I liked the basic premises behind "Antibodies" by Charles Stross and Greg Egan's "Oracle," but the punch of it got lost. If they were half as long, they'd be twice as good. Paul McAuley's "Reef" is written well, but kinda pointless. I liked the main character (a woman without genetic mods but with a sense of fair play) and the world where citizenship must be earned or bought, but there wasn't much to the plot. Albert Cowdrey's "Crux" would have been one of my favorites except for the ending, which rather ruined the bittersweet concept of trying to prevent a cataclysm but thereby erase the present. I wanted to like Steven Utley's "The Real World," in which a robot from the future comes back to prevent Alan Turing's persecution and help him accelerate the pace of scientific progress. Weirdly enough, the story gets bogged down in a vilification of C.S.Lewis and Christianity in general. M. Shayne Bell's "The Thing About Benny" and Robert Charles Wilson's "The Long Goodbye" are both exactly long enough for the cute, classic twists on stories that they tell. Ursula K Le Guin's "The Birthday of the World" and Nancy Kress's "Savior" were both great, but I'd read each of them too many times before. Others were just too long, not well-written, or had a forgettable premise. I found these to be: Peter Hamilton's "The Suspect Genome," in which an unscrupulous businessman is framed for one murder after committing another; Lucius Shepard's "Radiant Green Star," which is an unending tale of a boy growing up in a Vietnamese circus while training to avenge his family's death; propaganda for the Singularity in Alastair Reynold's "Great Wall of Mars"; the saccharine "Patient Zero" by Tananarive Due; the just plain boring "A Colder War" by Charles Stross; and the hardly intelligible "Milo and Sylvie" by Eliot Fintshel. Overall, fewer paragraphs of infodumps and technobabble explanations (although still far too many for my tastes) and more characterization than I'm used to getting from sf. 2000 was a pretty good year for the genre, apparently!

  4. 4 out of 5

    Timons Esaias

    Okay, so I'm only 16 years behind on this one. I buy the Dozois Best SF anthologies (as I did the Hartwell anthologies) every year, but in the first decade of this century I didn't get to reading them very often. As a result, a random half-dozen are still piled in my to-be-read assembly area. The good thing about these collections, though, is that they tend to bear up well over time. I enjoyed this one quite a bit, especially the last third of the collection. (I will note, however, that it's a si Okay, so I'm only 16 years behind on this one. I buy the Dozois Best SF anthologies (as I did the Hartwell anthologies) every year, but in the first decade of this century I didn't get to reading them very often. As a result, a random half-dozen are still piled in my to-be-read assembly area. The good thing about these collections, though, is that they tend to bear up well over time. I enjoyed this one quite a bit, especially the last third of the collection. (I will note, however, that it's a six-grimace anthology. Hmmm.) The reliable Michael Swanwick has a fun story in here, but it's Fantasy, not SF. Eliot Fintushel's "Milo and Sylvie" caught my fancy, with its imagination and memorable dialogue. "Obsidian Harvest" by Rick Cook & Ernest Hogan is a noir detective story set in an alternate history where the Aztecs still rule, but there are dinosaurs in South America. Including intelligent ones. Charles Stross has two stories here, and the second one, "A Colder War", is a riot of 1980's politics mashed up with H.P. Lovecraft. That story is out of control. I quite liked Tananarive Due's "Patient Zero". It's a heartbreaking account of the end of humanity, told via the journal of one of the early victims. There's a very tight little gem of a story by M. Shayne Bell ("The Thing about Benny") which I would suggest to teachers as a fine example of how to tell a big story (climate change and ecological collapse) by following one person doing a job created by that situation. One could also teach Robert Charles Wilson's flash fiction "The Great Goodbye", though it might come off as a mere gimmick piece. What I admired was the compression of a historical Singularity into the lives of a grandfather and grandson. It was emotionally engaging before the ending, and in a flash that's a nice trick. The last piece in the book is a novella from Ian McDonald's Chaga universe, which is enthralling and emotionally powerful. I'm struggling with Luna right now (though it has its moments), and it was nice to be reminded of why McDonald is on my "buy everything" list. The disappointment for me was the Alastair Reynolds story. It seemed to have a plot/logic hole in it big enough to shoot a thousand rockets through. But that's always the risk with science fiction.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Rena Sherwood

    Long and tedious anthology book-ended by Dozios' self-indulgence. Most of the stories and novellas are completely forgettable. The only story that stuck in my mind after all these years (I read it about 2006) was about Bobo the doomed cat. Skip this anthology and go for the sixth annual collection (1988.)

  6. 4 out of 5

    Maryanne

    The Years Best Science Fiction 18th annual collection edited Gardner Dozois The Juniper Tree - Jack Balden daughter Rosalind emigrate to society of Cousins 2085 on far side of moon. Jack plants juniper trees, Rosalind is kid friend Corey. Jack kills corey whose mom is Eva Jacks lover. Rosalind covers for him. Eva recreates Corey. Jack kills himself. Antibodies - Aliens on earth messing with this timeline goes bad, antibodies destroy interrogators and they leave this earth. The Birthday of the World The Years Best Science Fiction 18th annual collection edited Gardner Dozois The Juniper Tree - Jack Balden daughter Rosalind emigrate to society of Cousins 2085 on far side of moon. Jack plants juniper trees, Rosalind is kid friend Corey. Jack kills corey whose mom is Eva Jacks lover. Rosalind covers for him. Eva recreates Corey. Jack kills himself. Antibodies - Aliens on earth messing with this timeline goes bad, antibodies destroy interrogators and they leave this earth. The Birthday of the World - God kingdom falls. Ruaway saves them. Aliens become God. Ze and Tazu marry no kids (sister and brother match) Savior - space object waits centuries. Wei Wu Wei's A.I. disappears after "I understand, Good bye".Object sends unknown radiation to constellation Cassiopera. Reef - Reef on asteroid. Margaret goes in. Spores get expelled to space. Yay! Kuipers Belt. Going After Bobo - Lost cat on mountain brings family together. Sad! Crux - Future dark complex and boring. The Cure for Everything - Indians in Amazon being made to move out. Maria wants to help integrate them. He leaves with her. The Suspect Genome - Lar pick - Developer kills hippy old man then is accused of killing another man. Kid killer hide in boot of sister's car as she goes to soon to be brother-in-law black mailer The Raggle Tggle Gypsy-o - Lar pick- Motorcycle highway of time travel. Radiant Green Star - Kid lives with cirus Vietnam, uncle Vang really grandfather. Loves Tan. Kills father and marries Tan and is rich. Great Wall of Mars - Nevil and brother Warren. Nevil goes to co-joiners to make peace. Borgish! Galiana helps him and he is transenlightenment. Nano machines in brain. Milo and Sylvie - Shape shifter but doesn't know it. Milo is helped by Dr. Devore and Sylvie to understand his condition. Snow ball in Hell - Pigs that are human!! Bio-engineering. On the Orion Line - Kid on war ship that gets hit and is the only one to survive, but choose to go back to war (family). Oracle - Robert Stoney (gay) tortured by M5 in tiger cage in a basement somewhere. Rescued by android woman timeline changer Helen. Robert does inventions. Helen leaves for a ne timeline. Jack won't believe it isn't Satan. Obsidian Harvest - Uncle Tlaloc (Tzin) mayan stuff. Huetlacoatl races. Toltectecuhtli idiot hi-priest? puts Huetlacoatl eggs in human people tied to tables to co-join the two species. Disinfects with Tequila. Luck = Two Rabbits tells the story. Patient Zero - Kid in isolation survived disease from dad. Dr. Ben takes care of him. Everyone is dying. Veronic a nice nurs get needle stick and dies. Ms. Mauigut from hjaiti turors him. Tells him how to find food and what is good to eat. She gets sick and gives him code to his room door. Then does not return. He leaves. A Colder War - Project Koschei from WWII - big secret - alien machines can destroy things found in time rift. in Ukraine. Roger afraid of nuclear war and it comes because the Russians are using thing from fift that eat entire villages in Afghanistan. He ends up in rift waiting until earth is ok again. The Real World - Ivan pedologist soil studier goes through time rift to the Palezoic and Silurian seas. Brother Don writer movie, and Michelle Ivan's niece. The Thing About Benny - Benny is a weirdo who knows plants and searches for plants extinct in the wild that people have in pots. He listens only to Abba. He names a plant after Abba's Agnetha who is dead. The Great Goodbye - Kid and new human gramp go to museum then later sees gramps off on interstellar flight only new humans go. Tendeleo's Story - Set in Kenya. Ten is a kid and the Chaga is taking over the southern hemisphere. Lives with mom, dad and sister Little Egg. Crush of people fleeing the 50M a day advance of the Chaga and its new plops. She escapes by blackmailing and getting a UN chip. Goes to England falls in love with Sean. Get hurt and heals real fast. Sent back to Africa. Sean finds her by luck and the chip. They go and live in the Chaga.

  7. 4 out of 5

    James

    every single one of these collections is essential reading for true fans of science fiction short stories... each lengthy volume has a stellar array of all mini-genres and areas of powerfully influential science fiction: hard science, speculative, steampunk, alien invasions, apocalyptic/post-apocalyptic, space opera, fantasy, aliens, monsters, horror-ish, space travel, time travel, eco-science, evolutionary, pre-historic, parallel universes, extraterrestrials... in each successive volume in the every single one of these collections is essential reading for true fans of science fiction short stories... each lengthy volume has a stellar array of all mini-genres and areas of powerfully influential science fiction: hard science, speculative, steampunk, alien invasions, apocalyptic/post-apocalyptic, space opera, fantasy, aliens, monsters, horror-ish, space travel, time travel, eco-science, evolutionary, pre-historic, parallel universes, extraterrestrials... in each successive volume in the series the tales have advanced and grown in imagination and detail with our ability to envision greater concepts and possibilities... Rod Serling said, "...fantasy is the impossible made probable. science fiction is the improbable made possible..." and in the pages of these books is the absolute best the vastness of science fiction writing has to offer... sit back, relax, and dream...

  8. 4 out of 5

    Lord Humungus

    One of the best in the series, with my favorite Charles Stross story, "A Colder War", and one of my favorite Lucius Shepard stories, "Radiant Green Star". I hadn't read much (any?) of either of these authors at this point and afterwards, made it a point to browse their back catalog. This collection includes other great stories by LeGuin, Albert E Cowdrey, Baxter, Egan, Rick Cook & Ernest Hogan, and Ian McDonald. The Nancy Kress and Egan stories were among the favorites for both authors. This One of the best in the series, with my favorite Charles Stross story, "A Colder War", and one of my favorite Lucius Shepard stories, "Radiant Green Star". I hadn't read much (any?) of either of these authors at this point and afterwards, made it a point to browse their back catalog. This collection includes other great stories by LeGuin, Albert E Cowdrey, Baxter, Egan, Rick Cook & Ernest Hogan, and Ian McDonald. The Nancy Kress and Egan stories were among the favorites for both authors. This was one of the few collections whose cover I still recall.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Amy Peavy

    The last story in the book was called: Tendeléo's Story, by Ian McDonald. It was dark, but written in such a soothing tone. I am left with the sense of wonder I was missing in many other stories in the collection. I found many of the stories too scientific or mathematical for my taste. All of the stories were well written, but that doesn't mean I had to enjoy them all.

  10. 4 out of 5

    John Devlin

    If you read one sci-fi book a year, this is the one. Always stories of high caliber with a few tossed in that will keep you thinking weeks later, not to mention the collection is a primer for what science and technology everyone will be talking about five to ten years from now.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Kevin Groosalugg

    Maybe it's my mindset, but this wasn't as good as the others I've read. It had some really good stories: Patient Zero, Great Wall of Mars, and the final one by Iam MacDonald, but overall most seemeed like filler to me.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Ralph

    What I learned most from this book is that "year's best" books can be terribly boring. To be fair, not all the stories were bad, there were some I thought were fantastic, just not enough to rate it higher. I read to be entertained, not to bored, and reading this book was a chore.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Dean Parker

    these stories are not hot and cold; they are warm and cold. The cold are really cold. too bad. Some i would not even mention in a science fiction compilation. The best? Really? There must be some very bad stuff out there —

  14. 4 out of 5

    Monica Madaus

    I particularly liked the stories with a biology emphasis. I liked M. Shayne Bell's "The Thing About Benny," and Sverna Park's "The Cure for Everything," thought they're both a bit to glibly dystopian.

  15. 5 out of 5

    David

    Not worth the time it took.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Kevin Gallan

    27/617

  17. 5 out of 5

    Shapostrozny

    a couple good short stories/some bad.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Alex

    I registered a book at BookCrossing.com! http://www.BookCrossing.com/journal/12792768

  19. 4 out of 5

    Avel Rudenko

    About Bobo the cat. Bland story, great SS for passing time. Sadly, Bobo disappears.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Matt

    Unbelievable. It's not that every single story is a 5, but most are good to great. Some truly creative stories in this series.

  21. 4 out of 5

    René Beaulieu

  22. 5 out of 5

    Pinky AndThe Brain

  23. 4 out of 5

    Mark

  24. 5 out of 5

    Josh

  25. 4 out of 5

    Boris

  26. 4 out of 5

    Katherine Powers

  27. 5 out of 5

    Mike

  28. 5 out of 5

    Steelbound

  29. 4 out of 5

    Neil Shelley

  30. 5 out of 5

    Sunny

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.