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Max and Maurice a juvenile history in seven tricks

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This book was converted from its physical edition to the digital format by a community of volunteers. You may find it for free on the web. Purchase of the Kindle edition includes wireless delivery.

30 review for Max and Maurice a juvenile history in seven tricks

  1. 4 out of 5

    Matt

    Ach, was muss man oft von bösen Kindern hören oder lesen! So beginnt diese Geschichte von Max und Moritz: Bösewichte. Daraus ein Drama sich entspinnt, ein Augenschmaus für jedes Kind. Ach, was waren das für Zeiten als ich las die Herrlichkeiten: Die Geschichten von Herrn Busch und die Bilder, die er schuf. Malt mit Feder, malt mit Lauten War der erste, der sich's traute. Zack – war wieder mal ein Reim nur so hingezaubert mit Bravour. Die Behörden war'n dagegen sperrten seine Bücher wegen der eindeutigen Sprache Ach, was muss man oft von bösen Kindern hören oder lesen! So beginnt diese Geschichte von Max und Moritz: Bösewichte. Daraus ein Drama sich entspinnt, ein Augenschmaus für jedes Kind. Ach, was waren das für Zeiten als ich las die Herrlichkeiten: Die Geschichten von Herrn Busch und die Bilder, die er schuf. Malt mit Feder, malt mit Lauten War der erste, der sich's traute. Zack – war wieder mal ein Reim nur so hingezaubert mit Bravour. Die Behörden war'n dagegen sperrten seine Bücher wegen der eindeutigen Sprache und der Kritik an Mensch und Sache. Wilhelm Busch, dem war's nicht wichtig malte, schrieb und blieb scharfsichtig. Karikatur, Groteske und das Makab're war sein Grund. Den Plisch, den Plum, und Fipps den Affen, und auch Hans Huckebein hat er erschaffen. Dabei sind Max und Moritz, seines Geistes schönster Blitz, noch frisch – nicht fromm – aber ganz frei zu lesen in der Bücherei. 's hat mich bewogen mal zu diesen Reimen zu greifen, diesen fiesen. Doch Busch sei Dank, bald ist's vorbei Mit dieser Review-Schreiberei. Nur ein Ding will ich noch loswerden denn Max und Moritz sind auf Erden nun doch schon hunderfünfzig Jahre. Das sagn' wir Glückwunsch, Tusch, Fanfare!________________ Update 4/4/18 Found this wonderful dual-language (German/English) side-by-side version of M&M here . The site carries quite a few other 19th-Century German Stories along with their translations. Check it out! ________________ This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Manybooks

    Wilhelm Busch's Max und Moritz (not only an enduring and popular classic that is still in current print in Germany after more than 150 years, but is also considered amongst the forerunners of the comic book and thus of course the graphic novel), presents with rollicking rhyming verses (accompanied by the author's vivid, often outrageously intense illustrations) the nasty pranks of two young boys and their final (and in my humble opinion) more than well-deserved fateful demise (for the presented Wilhelm Busch's Max und Moritz (not only an enduring and popular classic that is still in current print in Germany after more than 150 years, but is also considered amongst the forerunners of the comic book and thus of course the graphic novel), presents with rollicking rhyming verses (accompanied by the author's vivid, often outrageously intense illustrations) the nasty pranks of two young boys and their final (and in my humble opinion) more than well-deserved fateful demise (for the presented and depicted pranks are, one and all, not merely mischievous, they are inherently destructive and imbued with viciousness, with violence or at the very least, they tend to engender and give rise to the latter). Now personally, while Max und Moritz has never been either a favourite childhood read or reading memory, I did in fact much enjoy having the book read to me as a youngster, although unlike my siblings, who seemed to find the two antagonists (Max and Moritz) and their antics quite massively funny and entertaining, ALL of my sympathies were as a rule with their hapless victims, but especially the tailor, the teacher and poor Uncle Fritz (although I do have to say that any and all sympathy I might have originally entertained for the Widow Bolte and the loss of her chickens and rooster was erased when she automatically assumed that her poor dog had absconded with the plucked chicken carcasses and then beat him mercilessly for something he did not do, this being in my opinion, almost but perhaps not quite as nasty and violent as Max and Moritz had been towards her and her poultry). Wilhelm Busch, much like his contemporary Heinrich Hoffmann (of Der Struwwelpeter fame) breaks and actually very clearly and vehemently breaks with the popular philosophy of the early 19th century that children in their "natural" state are supposedly both innocent and thus perfection (which ideal is in stark contrast to the concept of childhood that had been promoted in the latter part of the 18th century, where children, including literary children, are seen and depicted as miniature adults to be moulded and shaped at will). And thus, one can and really should proclaim that with their generally rebellious children, colourfully realistic and often also wildly imaginative illustrations, as well as their easily memorised and fun rhyming schemes (and often gruesome and in one's face content and themes), both Wilhelm Busch's Max und Moritz and Heinrich Hoffmann's Der Struwwelpeter totally and utterly break with and destroy both the late 18th and early 19th century traditions of perceived childhood. However, while in Hoffmann's Der Struwwelpeter, typical representations of bad (or rather assumed and approached as problematic) childhood behaviours such as thumb sucking, playing with matches, being a fidgeter, being a fussy eater etc. are depicted and criticised (with often dire consequences and outcomes for the children, the characters presented), Wilhelm Busch's Max und Moritz actually takes things much much further, as both antagonists, as both Max and Mortiz exhibit (and right from the very onset, I might add) an inherently and obvious nasty streak; they are by nature maliciously mischievous, and simply and utterly mean-spirited in almost every conceivable way. And thus, most if not even ALL of Max and Moritz's pranks are not simply practical jokes, are not just silly fun and games; they are vicious, they are violent, they are even potentially lethal (and with regard to the first prank, for the Widow Bolte's unfortunate chickens and rooster, the antics of Max and Mortiz are indeed torturous and deadly, as they slowly and painfully choke on the bread and strings Max and Moritz have given them). Furthermore, although neither the tailor nor the teacher end up dying because of the pranks played on them by Max and Moritz, these pranks well could have had a lethal outcome, as the tailor nearly drowns and the teacher is permanently scarred (because the two boys filled his pipe with gunpowder). Now I have always found it rather strangely problematic that especially many literary theorists and critics seem to be of the opinion that the end of Max und Moritz (where Wilhelm Busch has Max and Moritz being ground into grain and consumed by the miller's ducks) is somehow to be considered as more violent and infinitely more sadistic than any and all of the pranks the two boys have engaged in, and that therefore, both Max and Moritz are to be seen as primarily victims of adult society. True, none of the two boys' antics and behaviours have in fact resulted in humans being killed (although the same cannot be said with regard to the Widow Bolte's poultry). But really and truly, the fact that no humans are indeed killed during Max and Moritz's antics and pranks, that is in my opinion really and truly secondary and simply luck and good fortune, as the threat and possibility of death is definitely present with both the gunpowder in the pipe prank Max and Moritz play on the teacher and equally with the attempted drowning of the tailor. Max and Moritz are perhaps to a certain point punished (and yes, annihilated) because they and their pranks and antics violate established adult society, and adult behavioural norms (and their demise also depicts that at least on some level, Max and Moritz are to be seen as the symptoms of society, of adult routines and adult life, as seen for instance not only with regard to their own demise, but also with regard to how both the Widow Bolte and Uncle Fritz react with violence and physical rage to their plight, with the widow beating her innocent dog and rudely awakened Uncle Fritz killing and smashing the June bugs crawling over and in his bed). However, Max and Moritz are also individuals in their own right, and as such, they are clearly and obviously depicted as being viciously nasty and sadistic by nature (and with their pranks basically having reaped what they have deliberately and callously sown). They ruthlessly and with glee kill if not actually deliberately torture the Widow Bolte's chickens, they nearly cause the tailor's death by drowning and it is simply good fortune that the teacher does not get burned to death when he tries to smoke his gunpowder infused pipe. Yes, the ending of Max und Mortiz is harsh, potentially sadistic and definitely violent, but considering the inescapable fact and truth that the majority of Max and Moritz's pranks and antics are equally thus, or at least could and should be regarded as similarly and potentially thus (with a rather consistent possibility of lethal outcomes envisioned), the final act of adult frustration and revenge on the two boys reflects the pranks of Max and Moritz and vice versa. And it is therefore also both more than a bit facile and lazily convenient to claim that Max and Moritz are simply and for the most part either symptoms or victims of an authoritative society, and that both antagonists are present in Max und Moritz to primarily and for all intents and purposes unmask societal hypocrisy and dual standards. For while Wilhelm Busch definitely paints society and especially adult society as at best somewhat majorly problematic, I for one also firmly believe that the author has basically and with considerable glee created and depicted two inherently and by nature loathsome and vicious individuals, two vile little boys who would, even if they were situated and living in a paradisal, non authoritative, utopian society act and react with nastiness, vileness and subterfuge, with blatant animosity to all and sundry (for while there is definitely and obviously abundant societal criticism present and inherent within both Wilhelm Busch's words, his rhyming verses and his accompanying illustrations, first and foremost, Max and Moritz appear as two clearly and basically nasty and incurably vicious little monsters, whose only goal is their own satisfaction, whose only purpose in life seems to be to make their fellow man, their neighbours, their family members, whoever, as miserable as possible). Due to the graphic content and nature of Max und Moritz (not to mention the realistic and often brutal descriptiveness of the accompanying illustrations), Max und Moritz and actually much of Wilhelm Busch's literary oeuvre as a whole have often been and are sometimes still regarded as a bit askance and with trepidation (and especially Max und Moritz was in many areas of Germany, Austria and Switzerland considered both inappropriate and often censored until well into the early to middle 20th century). Some critics and especially educators (teachers, professors) actively worried that the pranks perpetrated by Max and Moritz (and that until the very end of the book, there was no punishments whatsoever depicted) would render especially young boys insubordinate and unmanageable (and even the fact that Max and Moritz met their end and doom by being ground up as grain and consumed by a flock of ducks was seen as inherently problematic by especially teachers, as the ending was considered as too outrageous and too exaggerated, read too fantastical to be believed or be seen as a legitimate cautionary note). And there have even and sadly, unfortunately been a select few so-called literary theorists and analysts who have tried to somehow cast blame at Wilhelm Busch and his literary work (and the popularity of the same) for the Third Reich, for German civilians rather readily accepting the Nazis (I guess this latter concept would have been a considerably easier and less painful manner of explaining why Nazism happened and why Hitler was so easily and quickly able to consolidate his power than to actually consider and try to analyse what happened and how the early 20th century, and for example, the aftermath of WWI and the Treaty of Versailles most likely helped prepare the road to Nazism, to Adolf Hitler and his despicable ilk). With regard to the text of Max und Moritz itself, the presented and utilised rhyme scheme is flowing, and the words, the vocabulary choices featured are both entertaining and still after more than 150 years, not at all old-fashioned, both reading and feeling wonderfully and entertainingly contemporary in both scope and general feel. Now in Julia Eccleshare's 1001 Children's Books You Must Read Before You Grow Up, Wilhelm Busch's Max und Moritz is considered suitable for children above the age of five or so, and that makes abundant sense to and for me. For even though Max und Moritz is indeed often read with and to children younger than five years of age (I think I was three the first time my mother read it to me), both the text and the content (as well as the often minutely graphic and in one's face accompanying illustrations) really do make this classic of German children's literature too potentially problematic and intense for the very very young (and in my opinion, care should also be taken introducing Max und Moritz to very sensitive, easily frightened children, as some, as in fact many of the depicted and featured pranks and especially the illustrations of said pranks are or at least can be potentially much disturbing). But I am indeed and in retrospect happy that Max und Moritz seems to never have been abridged or "sanitised" (as while the story is potentially disturbingly problematic and dated, it does paint an interesting and enlightening portrait of late 19th and early 20th century small town Germany, perhaps of Western Europe). And now finally (and yes, I do mean finally), Max und Moritz is indeed available in a multitude of English language translations (from different times and in fact different centuries). However, as I have not read ANY of these, I do not in any way feel that I should make suggestions as to which English language translation of Wilhelm Busch's Max und Moritz a potential reader who does not read German fluently enough to attempt the original might consider choosing (although I have found that especially with poetry translations, the more recently a given poetic work has been translated, the better and less halting and awkward it tends to be, although that is simply with regard to my own personal reading experiences over the years, and is in no way set in stone or for that matter a scientific or literary analysis, just a general and entirely personal feeling).

  3. 4 out of 5

    Liam

    Wortschatz zum Deutschlernen zum Guten[n] zu bekehren - to be converted to good behaviour necken - to tease die Zwetschge - plum abmalen - depicted der Streich - prank das Federvieh - poultry Einesteils - "Firstly" das Pfühle - pillow, same as Kissen geschwinde - rapidly sich schneiden - intersect entzwei - in two, asunder munter - energetic/ally sich beseinnen - reflect sich reißen - struggled (?) dürr - scraggly der Ast - bough bang - afraid ahnungsvoll - full of foreboding der Graus - horror betrübt - afflicted n Wortschatz zum Deutschlernen zum Guten[n] zu bekehren - to be converted to good behaviour necken - to tease die Zwetschge - plum abmalen - depicted der Streich - prank das Federvieh - poultry Einesteils - "Firstly" das Pfühle - pillow, same as Kissen geschwinde - rapidly sich schneiden - intersect entzwei - in two, asunder munter - energetic/ally sich beseinnen - reflect sich reißen - struggled (?) dürr - scraggly der Ast - bough bang - afraid ahnungsvoll - full of foreboding der Graus - horror betrübt - afflicted nienieden - the aforementioned verzehren - consume abrufen - demand scharren - scrabble der Schornstein - chimneypot schmurgeln - to fry lieblich - delightfully schwärmen - enthuse Spitz - common name for a dog bei der Sache (tätig) sein - to concentrate on the matter (actively) angewurzelt - glued to the spot das Ungetüm - monster im Verstecke [m] - stuffed die Hecke - hedge Fräcke [m] - jacket (pl) Westen [f] - waistcoat (pl) Gamaschen [f] - gaiters flicken - patch up anstücken - clip on einerlei - whatever it may be verdrießlich - annoyed das Gebrause - shower (Brause) träge - lethargic die Tücke - deceit Zeigenböcke [m] - billy-goats (pl) die Elle - a cubit, also the measuring rod of this length die Schwelle - threshold Todeshast - the hastiness of nearing death krampfhaft - desperately Magendrücken - stomach cramps das Bügeleisen - flat-iron achtgeben auf etwas - pay attention to unverdrossen - undaunted der Possen - antics angreifen - molest (?) bieder - honest Buben - scoundrels sich schlichen - slink off Stuben - rooms Meerschaumpfeife - elegant pipe lenken - steer, direct das Getöse - boom das Tintenfaß - inkwell abkriegen - to get something out of something Mohren - Moors der Schopf - tuft of hair vermehren - increase der Fidibus - paper firelighters dienstbeflissen - officious die Prise - pinch ist bedacht - anxious to do something das Krabbeltier - bug sausen - rush das Genicke - nape of the neck das Gebrumm - buzzing hauen - clobber der Teig - dough das Jammerbild - a pitiable sight der Glut - the glow perdü - "a goner" wehe euch - woeful for you das Getreide - cereals das Lumpenpack - the good for nothings mahlen - grind der Trichter - funnel die Böserichter - the wrong-doers verzehren - be eaten us angehen - to address

  4. 4 out of 5

    Emily

    My husband has a German copy of this book, but it was a bit long to ask for his translation. Fortunately I was able to read it in English at http://www.childrensbooksonline.org/m... All I can say is it's one gruesome cautionary tale. Max and Moritz get into all sorts of trouble that would put today's kids into juvenile detention--they put dynamite in a teacher's pipe, kill the neighbor's chickens (in a terrible way!), and are baked inside some dough while trying to steal pretzels (but somehow are My husband has a German copy of this book, but it was a bit long to ask for his translation. Fortunately I was able to read it in English at http://www.childrensbooksonline.org/m... All I can say is it's one gruesome cautionary tale. Max and Moritz get into all sorts of trouble that would put today's kids into juvenile detention--they put dynamite in a teacher's pipe, kill the neighbor's chickens (in a terrible way!), and are baked inside some dough while trying to steal pretzels (but somehow are able to eat their way out). A frustrated farmer finally exacts revenge in what, to me, was a surprising and horrible end. I think it's worth reading just for the shock value! They definitely don't make children's stories like this anymore. My husband has good memories of this book though, and remembers his grandfather calling him and his cousins Max und Moritz when they were making trouble.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Annie

    Das Buch, das ich mit Abstand schon als Kind am häufigsten gelesen habe - nun, dank Projekt Gutenberg, auch auf English. Ehrlich gesagt hätte ich nicht erwartet, dass man es gescheit übersetze kann. Aber es klingt! Beispiel Lieblingsstelle: "Fließet aus dem Aug', ihr Tränen! All mein Hoffen, all mein Sehnen, Meines Lebens schönster Traum Hängt an diesem Apfelbaum!!" From her eyes the tears are streaming: "Oh, my cares, my toil, my dreaming ! Ah, life's fairest hope," says she, "Hangs upon that apple-t Das Buch, das ich mit Abstand schon als Kind am häufigsten gelesen habe - nun, dank Projekt Gutenberg, auch auf English. Ehrlich gesagt hätte ich nicht erwartet, dass man es gescheit übersetze kann. Aber es klingt! Beispiel Lieblingsstelle: "Fließet aus dem Aug', ihr Tränen! All mein Hoffen, all mein Sehnen, Meines Lebens schönster Traum Hängt an diesem Apfelbaum!!" From her eyes the tears are streaming: "Oh, my cares, my toil, my dreaming ! Ah, life's fairest hope," says she, "Hangs upon that apple-tree."

  6. 4 out of 5

    Ro Prufrock

    klassiker hin oder her, hat hier noch jemand seit ungefähr 20 jahren albträume von dem scheiß? especially die geschichte mit den hühnern.

  7. 5 out of 5

    aljouharah altheeyb

    أقدر افهم ان النهايات المتوحشه هُنا لم تكن شيئاً مذكوراً وقت نشرها. لكن كشخص كان يؤمن بأن دخول الفريزر سيحولك لآيسكريم - حتى التصق مره لساني بسقف الفريزير وعرفت معنى الألم واليأس - وأنه بإمكان الشخص أن يغسل نفسه من القذاره مع ملابسه مرة واحده عندما يدخل غسالة الملابس - حتى اكتشفت الندبة الكبيرة جداً في ذراع خالي الذي طبق هذا الإعتقاد في صغره - كشخص كان يؤمن بأمور كهذه، أعتقد أن رؤية ماكس ومورتيز يخرجان من فرن الطباخ حيين ومن ثم يُطحنان في مطحنة الدقيق ليأكلهما البط سيرعبني حتى النخاع. الأمر مرعب أقدر افهم ان النهايات المتوحشه هُنا لم تكن شيئاً مذكوراً وقت نشرها. لكن كشخص كان يؤمن بأن دخول الفريزر سيحولك لآيسكريم - حتى التصق مره لساني بسقف الفريزير وعرفت معنى الألم واليأس - وأنه بإمكان الشخص أن يغسل نفسه من القذاره مع ملابسه مرة واحده عندما يدخل غسالة الملابس - حتى اكتشفت الندبة الكبيرة جداً في ذراع خالي الذي طبق هذا الإعتقاد في صغره - كشخص كان يؤمن بأمور كهذه، أعتقد أن رؤية ماكس ومورتيز يخرجان من فرن الطباخ حيين ومن ثم يُطحنان في مطحنة الدقيق ليأكلهما البط سيرعبني حتى النخاع. الأمر مرعب الآن، الموت نتيجه حتميه وطبيعية، وهذا أمر لا تخفيه كتب الأطفال حتى بدايات القرن العشرين، بل وتضعه كنتاج لكل تصرف سيء يفعله الطفل. إلعب بأعواد الثقاب لتحرقك حتى يبقى حذائك. مُص ابهامك حتى يأتي قاطع الإبعام ليقصه لك. تسلل لبيت الخبباز حتى يبيعك للطاحونة ويطعمك للبط. شكراً جزيلاً، أفضل البقاء طفلاً مؤدباً على ذلك خخخ. In the village not a word, Not a sign, of grief, was heard. Widow Tibbets speaking low, Said, "I thought it would be so!" "None but self," cried Buck, "to blame! Mischief is not life's true aim!" Then said gravely Teacher Lämpel, "There again is an example!" "To be sure! bad thing for youth," Said the Baker, "a sweet tooth !" Even Uncle says, "Good folks! See what comes of stupid jokes!" But the honest farmer: "Guy! What concern is that to I?" Through the place in short there went One wide murmur of content: "God be praised! the town is free From this great rascality!” للقراءة اون لاين : http://germanstories.vcu.edu/mm/mmmen...

  8. 5 out of 5

    Malia

    This takes me back...my grandmother used to read these stories to me when I was little and growing up in Germany. The stories, as seems to be the norm for the tales of German childhood, are often a bit on the gruesome side. But I have quite fond memories. Find more reviews and bookish fun at http://www.princessandpen.com

  9. 5 out of 5

    Helmut

    Cáiféng, cáiféng, mie mie mie! Das ist wirklich eine tolle Veröffentlichung: Der Dichter Lu Yuan hat 1990 den Busch-Klassiker im Chinesischen nachgedichtet. Dieser Text liegt nun als zweisprachige Ausgabe vor. Der Text liegt zweispaltig vor: Sowohl in chinesischen Zeichen (linke Spalte) als auch in Pinyin (rechte Spalte), wobei die Töne mit Diakritika angegeben sind. Zusätzlich dazu gibt es den vollständigen deutschen Text im Anhang. Ergänzt wird das ganze durch ein Nachwort über Lu Yuan und eine Cáiféng, cáiféng, mie mie mie! Das ist wirklich eine tolle Veröffentlichung: Der Dichter Lu Yuan hat 1990 den Busch-Klassiker im Chinesischen nachgedichtet. Dieser Text liegt nun als zweisprachige Ausgabe vor. Der Text liegt zweispaltig vor: Sowohl in chinesischen Zeichen (linke Spalte) als auch in Pinyin (rechte Spalte), wobei die Töne mit Diakritika angegeben sind. Zusätzlich dazu gibt es den vollständigen deutschen Text im Anhang. Ergänzt wird das ganze durch ein Nachwort über Lu Yuan und eine kurze Zusammenfassung der Ausspracheregeln des Pinyin. Die Originalillustrationen sind ebenso mit abgedruckt und lockern den Text auf. Sehr schöne Veröffentlichung, ich würde gern mehr in dieser Art sehen.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Susan

    I read this in the original German. The rhyme flows nicely, although the language includes some colloquial German words and was not always clear to me. The story is frightful. The two boys in question really need someone to rein them in, and disaster does strike them at the end. It is somewhat humorous - but only when one begins to identify with the boys and their pranks. It is a children's story - but.... not really. I tried to explain some of the plot to my 9-year old daughter. She just could n I read this in the original German. The rhyme flows nicely, although the language includes some colloquial German words and was not always clear to me. The story is frightful. The two boys in question really need someone to rein them in, and disaster does strike them at the end. It is somewhat humorous - but only when one begins to identify with the boys and their pranks. It is a children's story - but.... not really. I tried to explain some of the plot to my 9-year old daughter. She just could not fathom why the boys were doing such naughty, mean, and hurtful pranks.

  11. 4 out of 5

    sabisteb aka callisto

    Auch Wilhelm Buschs Max und Moritz hatte ich als Kind und habe es oft durchgeblättert und gelesen. Zwei böse Jungen treiben teils recht dümmliche Streiche. Geliebt habe ich die Geschichten nicht, ich fand sie aber auch nicht grausam, sie waren OK, mehr aber auch nicht. Aus heutiger Sicht, sehe ich die Geschichte teils sehr anders. Meist sind die Jungs eher unschuldig, bzw. die Streiche wirklich harmlos und die Erwachsenen oft selber Schuld. Erster Streich: Max und Moritz lassen Hühner große, mite Auch Wilhelm Buschs Max und Moritz hatte ich als Kind und habe es oft durchgeblättert und gelesen. Zwei böse Jungen treiben teils recht dümmliche Streiche. Geliebt habe ich die Geschichten nicht, ich fand sie aber auch nicht grausam, sie waren OK, mehr aber auch nicht. Aus heutiger Sicht, sehe ich die Geschichte teils sehr anders. Meist sind die Jungs eher unschuldig, bzw. die Streiche wirklich harmlos und die Erwachsenen oft selber Schuld. Erster Streich: Max und Moritz lassen Hühner große, miteinander verbundene Köder schlucken. Das Federvieh verschluckt sich und erstickt. Ich bin mir nicht sicher, ob das funktionieren würde. Hühner picken und schlucken nicht so große Brocken. Insgesamt jedoch Tierquälerei. Zweiter Streich: Diebstahl der ermordeten Hühnertiere. Dass Witwe Bolte den Spitz verdächtigt, dafür können die Jungs nichts. Für den Spitz natürlich dumm gelaufen, Witwe Bolte ist aber halt nicht sonderlich helle, sonst würde sie doch wissen, dass ein so kleiner Hund nicht drei Hühner und einen Hahn in so kurzer Zeit samt Knochen verschlingen kann, ohne Spuren zu hinterlassen. Logik ist keine Stärke dieser Dame. Dritter Streich: Die Jungs säge eine Brücke an, der Schneider fällt ins Wasser. Sachbeschädigung, mehr nicht. Die Brücke ist nicht mehr als ein Brett. Harmloser Jungenstreich. Das Bügeln des Bauches hingegen, das sehe ich kritisch, das solltet ihr, liebe Kinder, lieber nicht nachmachen, das führt zu bösen Verbrennungen. Vierter Streich: Max und Moitz vertauschen Tabak mit Schwarzpulver. Ganz ehrlich, wer Waffen und Schwarzpulver so einfach für Kinder zugänglich aufbewahrt ist selber Schuld. Fünfter Streich: Max und Moritz verstecken Maikäfer im Bett es Onkels. Harmlos. Davon abgesehen, dass Maikäfer nicht wirklich häufig sind, waren sie wenigstens tagsüber harmlos beschäftigt mit der Suche. Warum nur, muss der Onkel die armen Käfer erschlagen, konnte er sie nicht einfach aufsammeln und aussetzen? Sechster Streich: Max und Moritz brechen in die Bäckerei ein. Nun frage ich mich, warum der Becker das Mehl direkt unter dem Schornstein lagert, da könnte es doch auch draufregnen und das Mehl zu schimmeln anfangen. Überhaupt, wie kann er es wagen, Kinder, die es nicht besser wissen in den Ofen zu stecken? Dass sie überleben ist wohl derselbe Effekt wie das mit Eis gefüllte Blätterteiggebäck, dass man so bekommt, da schmilzt das Eis ja auch nicht. Letzter Streich: Max und Moritz werden wegen eigentlich harmloser Steiche zu Tiermehl verarbeitet und an die Hühner verfüttert. Hoffentlich hatten die beiden kein Kreuzfeld Jackob, sonst ist ihre Rache im Nachhinein fürchterlich. Das Buch konnte mich weder als Kind noch als Erwachsene begeistern. Eine nette, harmlose Geschichte in Reimen. Keine Ahnung, warum die so berühmt wurde. Da ich sie als Kind teils auch als langweilig empfand, würde ich sie auch keinem Kind vorlesen, vor allem, weil ich mich langweilen würde.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Federica Guglietta - illunedideilibri.it

    Nei sette episodi di Max e Moritz, che hanno l’aspetto di due bambini normalissimi, non c’è assolutamente nessun giudizio morale al piccolo, assennato mondo borghese, che è sì rappresentato nelle sue manifestazioni professionali dai personaggi succubi degli scherzi dei due monelli, ma la cui grettezza non è stigmatizzata dagli aspetti fisici, quanto piuttosto dai comportamenti. Con assoluto talento Busch usa la natura immaginativa del fumetto (certo, il fumetto racconta necessariamente storie) p Nei sette episodi di Max e Moritz, che hanno l’aspetto di due bambini normalissimi, non c’è assolutamente nessun giudizio morale al piccolo, assennato mondo borghese, che è sì rappresentato nelle sue manifestazioni professionali dai personaggi succubi degli scherzi dei due monelli, ma la cui grettezza non è stigmatizzata dagli aspetti fisici, quanto piuttosto dai comportamenti. Con assoluto talento Busch usa la natura immaginativa del fumetto (certo, il fumetto racconta necessariamente storie) per ricostruire il proprio mondo ma, a differenza degli autori che l’hanno preceduto, sottrae alla natura mimetica del disegno ogni funzione conoscitiva, caricandolo di quella funzione costitutiva che diventerà, quando usata dai grandi autori, la caratteristica più potente del fumetto. Leggi la recensione completa qui: http://illunedideilibri.it/max-e-mori...

  13. 5 out of 5

    Jim Peterson

    (review for learners of German) Like Struwwelpeter, Max und Moritz is one of the most well-known children’s tales in Germany. It has fun pictures and the verses are actually quite nice. It’s probably a bit easier to read than Struwwelpeter. The pictures will help beginners understand the story better without having to look up every word. That’s an important skill to learn when reading another language: read for the gist and don’t worry about every single word you don’t understand. With that in mi (review for learners of German) Like Struwwelpeter, Max und Moritz is one of the most well-known children’s tales in Germany. It has fun pictures and the verses are actually quite nice. It’s probably a bit easier to read than Struwwelpeter. The pictures will help beginners understand the story better without having to look up every word. That’s an important skill to learn when reading another language: read for the gist and don’t worry about every single word you don’t understand. With that in mind, even A2-level (elementary) readers can enjoy it.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Cathy (cathepsut)

    A classic cautionary tale about two nasty little boys getting up to all kinds of pranks and their gruesome ending. I never perceived this as a violent book as a child. It was just one of those stories you read as a kid in Germany, same as Struwwelpeter. Good fun, great drawings, very not 'politically correct', but I think children today would still like it. English version: http://www.childrensbooksonline.org/m...

  15. 5 out of 5

    Marika

    i have fond memories of this growing up!

  16. 4 out of 5

    Mila

    Loved it when I was a child.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Rebecca

    Am devotedly unilingual so read translation. Naughty children ground into animal feed. Feasted upon by ducks. *refuses to heed 'conform or die' message*

  18. 5 out of 5

    Sheri

    Rhythm, rhyme, and line collaborate with wickedly intoxicating result. The book jacket says it best: By turns malevolent, jovial, sardonic, diabolical and bloodthirsty, these verses tellingly castigate hypocrisy, stodginess, stupidity, egotism. drunkenness, and other human foibles. The English translations, printed opposite the original German, are ingenious and faithful, with spice and sense intact. (warning: the rhythms and rhyme only work if one reads this with British inflection and pronunci Rhythm, rhyme, and line collaborate with wickedly intoxicating result. The book jacket says it best: By turns malevolent, jovial, sardonic, diabolical and bloodthirsty, these verses tellingly castigate hypocrisy, stodginess, stupidity, egotism. drunkenness, and other human foibles. The English translations, printed opposite the original German, are ingenious and faithful, with spice and sense intact. (warning: the rhythms and rhyme only work if one reads this with British inflection and pronunciation. With an American accent, words don't rhyme and consonance is off, leading to the translation seeming flat.).

  19. 4 out of 5

    Книжни Криле

    Поет, разказвач, хуморист, илюстратор и карикатурист, класик. Представяме ви прадядото на комиксите Вилхелм Буш! Днес неговото творчество е събрано в прекрасен сборник в голям формат и с твърди корици, част от библиотека „Жива вода” на ик. „Труд”. В него ще откриете знаменитите герои Макс и Мориц, които пристигат в чудесно издание заедно с още цял куп весели истории в картинки! Прочетете ревюто на "Книжни Криле": https://knijnikrile.wordpress.com/201...

  20. 4 out of 5

    Charlotte

    This is a dark little children's book in which some naughty little ones get their due. Pass on this one if your little one is anxious or sensitive to violence. I am a little past 1/4th of the way through the '1001 Children's books you should read before you grow-up" list and I really appreciate this vein of children's books with dark, realistic themes. I originally thought that books for children with dark themes didn't emerge untill after 9-11. It turns out that this might only be true in Ameri This is a dark little children's book in which some naughty little ones get their due. Pass on this one if your little one is anxious or sensitive to violence. I am a little past 1/4th of the way through the '1001 Children's books you should read before you grow-up" list and I really appreciate this vein of children's books with dark, realistic themes. I originally thought that books for children with dark themes didn't emerge untill after 9-11. It turns out that this might only be true in American Children's lit.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Tom Romig

    I've seen references to Max and Moritz over the years, seen examples of Wilhelm Busch's drawings and verse, but never experienced anything but snippets. On a recent trip to Germany, our estimable tour guide encouraged us to become more familiar with these incorrigible lads. Well, thanks to him because I thoroughly enjoyed this offering of wonderful antics by M&M and other "more or less human or approximately animal" creations of Busch. The darkly comic misadventures of these so often brutal I've seen references to Max and Moritz over the years, seen examples of Wilhelm Busch's drawings and verse, but never experienced anything but snippets. On a recent trip to Germany, our estimable tour guide encouraged us to become more familiar with these incorrigible lads. Well, thanks to him because I thoroughly enjoyed this offering of wonderful antics by M&M and other "more or less human or approximately animal" creations of Busch. The darkly comic misadventures of these so often brutal creatures could have been called "when bad things happen to bad people."

  22. 4 out of 5

    Ruben

    I so wanted to write a rhyming review in six different languages, but then I realized I couldn't. I did, however, actually read every line in this book. I had the most trouble with the Latin and the Italian, but the German, Spanish, French and English were pretty funny. It's not the best children's story (and it's definitely not an American story), but I guess it's something of a classic. I'd love to find more polyglot books like this one.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Armillaria

    http://www.armillaria.org/catalogo1/c...

  24. 5 out of 5

    Franziska

    It's a classic!

  25. 4 out of 5

    BELIEVESINMIRACLES

    Fantastic !!! The old ' you sow what you reap ' even if you are children, is what this is all about. A bit gruesome I suppose, but I am a Roald Dahl fan, so right up my alley !

  26. 5 out of 5

    Juli

    Entretenido!! Sin lugar a dudas bueno para aprender un poco de otros idiomas

  27. 5 out of 5

    Sarlis

    Kindheit pur & endlich hab ich es wieder im Regal stehen :)

  28. 4 out of 5

    Syed Faizan

    Ich liebe deutsche Literatur und habe beschlossen, so viele klassische deutsche Bücher wie möglich . Ich unterhalte mich manchmal auf den sozialen Netzwerken mit den vielen deutschsprachigen Freunde. Dabei wurde mir diese Buch oft empfohlen. Anscheinend ist dieses Buch ein wichtiges Beispiel der deutschen Kinderliteratur, also auch eine schöne Erinnerung an die Kindheit. Nachdem ich das Buch fertig gelesen habe is mir klar, warum das Buch so beachtet wird. Die kurzen Gedichte sind sehr lustig un Ich liebe deutsche Literatur und habe beschlossen, so viele klassische deutsche Bücher wie möglich . Ich unterhalte mich manchmal auf den sozialen Netzwerken mit den vielen deutschsprachigen Freunde. Dabei wurde mir diese Buch oft empfohlen. Anscheinend ist dieses Buch ein wichtiges Beispiel der deutschen Kinderliteratur, also auch eine schöne Erinnerung an die Kindheit. Nachdem ich das Buch fertig gelesen habe is mir klar, warum das Buch so beachtet wird. Die kurzen Gedichte sind sehr lustig und geschmackvoll gereimt. Zusätzlich sind die Ideen und Streiche ( die Gedichte sind nach Schreichen unterteilt) sehr gut erfunden. Über die beiden Bösewichte, Max und Moritz, können sowohl Erwachsene als auch Kinder genießen und lächeln ! Die Illustrationen (die von Wilhelm Busch selbst stammen) sind auch besonders hervorragend und heitern zusätzlich auf! Lesen Sie, und, wenn Sie Kinder haben , lesen Sie und tragen Sie diese Gedichte vor, um Licht und Segen in die Kindheit Ihrer Kinder mit der Macht der schönen Poesie zu tragen!

  29. 4 out of 5

    Sho

    One of my books of Classic German Literature that I got for Christmas. It's a series of short poems about the very naughty Max & Moritz who came to a very sticky and final end. This is how it starts: Ach, was muss man oft von bösen Kindern hören oder lesen! Wie zum Beispiel hier von diesen, Welche Max und Moritz heißen; Die, anstatt durch weise Lehren Sich zum Guten zu bekehrren, Oftmals noch darüber lachten Und sich heimlich lustig machten. Which losely translated would be: how often do we have to her One of my books of Classic German Literature that I got for Christmas. It's a series of short poems about the very naughty Max & Moritz who came to a very sticky and final end. This is how it starts: Ach, was muss man oft von bösen Kindern hören oder lesen! Wie zum Beispiel hier von diesen, Welche Max und Moritz heißen; Die, anstatt durch weise Lehren Sich zum Guten zu bekehrren, Oftmals noch darüber lachten Und sich heimlich lustig machten. Which losely translated would be: how often do we have to here or read about naughty children Like these two, for example, who are called Max and Moritz Who, instead of learning to be good boys Often laughed about it and secretly made fun of things. Or something like that.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Steph

    Ich bin über diese Geschichte sehr zwiegespalten. Zum einen gefallen mir die Reime und die einzelnen Storys schon sehr gut. Auf der anderen Seite ist die Moral des Buches doch sehr überholt und veraltet. Vor allem dass Max und Moritz am Ende sterben (eigentlich ja eher umgebracht werden) und sich alle darüber freuen, ist aus heutiger Sicht ja eher fragwürdig. Trotzdem in meinen augen ein Klassiker, aber wohl eher nichts für schwache Kindernerven. Ich habe das Buch als Kind selbst vorgelesen beko Ich bin über diese Geschichte sehr zwiegespalten. Zum einen gefallen mir die Reime und die einzelnen Storys schon sehr gut. Auf der anderen Seite ist die Moral des Buches doch sehr überholt und veraltet. Vor allem dass Max und Moritz am Ende sterben (eigentlich ja eher umgebracht werden) und sich alle darüber freuen, ist aus heutiger Sicht ja eher fragwürdig. Trotzdem in meinen augen ein Klassiker, aber wohl eher nichts für schwache Kindernerven. Ich habe das Buch als Kind selbst vorgelesen bekommen und auch schon meinem eigenen Kind vorgelesen. Mein Sohn konnte eine Zeit lang sogar einige Passagen auswendig.

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