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Glinda of Oz: In Which Are Related the Exciting Experiences of Princess Ozma of Oz, and Dorothy, in Their Hazardous Journey to the Home of the Flatheads, and to the Magic Isle of the Skeezers, and How They Were Rescued from Dire Peril by the Sorcery of...

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Peace, prosperity, and happiness are the rule in the marvelous Land of Oz, but in a faraway corner of this magical domain dwell two tribes--the Flatheads and the Skeezers--who have declared war on each other. Determined to keep her subjects from fighting, the Ruler of Oz, Princess Ozma, along with her dearest friend, Princess Dorothy Gale (formerly of Kansas), embarks on a Peace, prosperity, and happiness are the rule in the marvelous Land of Oz, but in a faraway corner of this magical domain dwell two tribes--the Flatheads and the Skeezers--who have declared war on each other. Determined to keep her subjects from fighting, the Ruler of Oz, Princess Ozma, along with her dearest friend, Princess Dorothy Gale (formerly of Kansas), embarks on a quest to restore peace.When the Supreme Dictator of the Flatheads refuses to cooperate with Ozma, she and Dorothy seek out Queen Coo-ee-oh of the Skeezers, hoping she will be more reasonable. But the queen imprisons Ozma and Dorothy in her grand city and then traps them by submerging the whole city under water. Now it is up to Glinda the Good to save the day. She assembles all of Ozma's counsellors--including such beloved Oz friends as the Scarecrow, Tin Woodman, Cowardly Lion, Patchwork Girl, Shaggy Man, Tik-Tok, and Wizard of Oz--and they set out to rescue their friends. Will the magic powers of Glinda and the Wizard combined be enough to free Ozma and Dorothy? A rousing tale of suspense, magic, and adventure, Glinda of Oz is the fourteenth and final Oz book by L. Frank Baum. It's a grand conclusion to his chronicles of America's favorite fairyland. This deluxe gift edition features all twelve of Oz artist John R. Neill's beautiful color plates, along with his nearly one hundred black-and-white pictures, making it a perfect gift for all Oz fans, new and old.


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Peace, prosperity, and happiness are the rule in the marvelous Land of Oz, but in a faraway corner of this magical domain dwell two tribes--the Flatheads and the Skeezers--who have declared war on each other. Determined to keep her subjects from fighting, the Ruler of Oz, Princess Ozma, along with her dearest friend, Princess Dorothy Gale (formerly of Kansas), embarks on a Peace, prosperity, and happiness are the rule in the marvelous Land of Oz, but in a faraway corner of this magical domain dwell two tribes--the Flatheads and the Skeezers--who have declared war on each other. Determined to keep her subjects from fighting, the Ruler of Oz, Princess Ozma, along with her dearest friend, Princess Dorothy Gale (formerly of Kansas), embarks on a quest to restore peace.When the Supreme Dictator of the Flatheads refuses to cooperate with Ozma, she and Dorothy seek out Queen Coo-ee-oh of the Skeezers, hoping she will be more reasonable. But the queen imprisons Ozma and Dorothy in her grand city and then traps them by submerging the whole city under water. Now it is up to Glinda the Good to save the day. She assembles all of Ozma's counsellors--including such beloved Oz friends as the Scarecrow, Tin Woodman, Cowardly Lion, Patchwork Girl, Shaggy Man, Tik-Tok, and Wizard of Oz--and they set out to rescue their friends. Will the magic powers of Glinda and the Wizard combined be enough to free Ozma and Dorothy? A rousing tale of suspense, magic, and adventure, Glinda of Oz is the fourteenth and final Oz book by L. Frank Baum. It's a grand conclusion to his chronicles of America's favorite fairyland. This deluxe gift edition features all twelve of Oz artist John R. Neill's beautiful color plates, along with his nearly one hundred black-and-white pictures, making it a perfect gift for all Oz fans, new and old.

30 review for Glinda of Oz: In Which Are Related the Exciting Experiences of Princess Ozma of Oz, and Dorothy, in Their Hazardous Journey to the Home of the Flatheads, and to the Magic Isle of the Skeezers, and How They Were Rescued from Dire Peril by the Sorcery of...

  1. 4 out of 5

    Evgeny

    Two small nations of the Land of Oz declared war on each other. When Ozma learned about this she decided it is her duty as a ruler of all Oz to make peace between the nations. Off she went accompanied by Dorothy who wanted to tag along. Pretty soon it turned out the girls bit off much more than they can chew – their magic trinkets and all. Magic heavyweights of the Land – Glinda and the Wizard – had to join the fun very soon. L. Frank Baum wrote the book being mortally ill. As such it was suppose Two small nations of the Land of Oz declared war on each other. When Ozma learned about this she decided it is her duty as a ruler of all Oz to make peace between the nations. Off she went accompanied by Dorothy who wanted to tag along. Pretty soon it turned out the girls bit off much more than they can chew – their magic trinkets and all. Magic heavyweights of the Land – Glinda and the Wizard – had to join the fun very soon. L. Frank Baum wrote the book being mortally ill. As such it was supposed to be the darkest book of the series and for this reason I was eager to read it to see how dark you can get in a children book. To my complete and utter surprise I could not find any dark themes at all. The only part which can be somewhat qualified was about Ozma finally learning she is not all that powerful. This lesson was way overdue, but I am afraid it would be lost on her. There was no even “Everybody died. The (happy) end” kind of dark from another very popular children series written by an author who was not dying at the time. Coming back to plot, the book was actually better than several previous ones. It contains much less recycled material, has more unusual creatures and some interesting developments. Anybody who can write a cheerful book knowing he/she is not going to last long surely deserves respect, so I have to say, “Dear Mr. Baum, you have mine for creating a wonderful place which captured the imagination of several generations of children everywhere”.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Shoshana

    (4.5, but for Oz's sake I'll err up instead of down.) I've read reviews that suggest that Glinda of Oz is the darkest, possibly because Baum knew he was dying at that point. I don't actually see explicit darkness, but I do think that there is an element of fear in this one that there isn't in the rest, that things might not actually turn out right. Of course, as an adult, it is clear to me that they're going to figure it out, but I remember as a kid liking Glinda of Oz less even while knowing tha (4.5, but for Oz's sake I'll err up instead of down.) I've read reviews that suggest that Glinda of Oz is the darkest, possibly because Baum knew he was dying at that point. I don't actually see explicit darkness, but I do think that there is an element of fear in this one that there isn't in the rest, that things might not actually turn out right. Of course, as an adult, it is clear to me that they're going to figure it out, but I remember as a kid liking Glinda of Oz less even while knowing that it was one of the better ones, because it felt - I think I would have described it as frustrating, but I think what I was really feeling was stress. It's stressful, because (for a kid) it's suspenseful. Your worried. They try everything they (and you) can think of, and Ozma and Dorothy and the island are still underwater, and Glinda, who you're accustomed to seeing swoop in to save the day with ease, is just as helpless as the rest of them. It's also one of the more powerful books in the series, not just because the problem is hard to solve but because when they do solve it it takes all of them - Ozma, Glinda, Dorothy, the Skeezers, Red Reera the Yookoohoo (my favorite character in this one! She's in only two chapters, but they're by far my favorite chapters of the whole book!), and the three Adepts. Although Ozians are accustomed to discussing what to do, coming to agreement, and carrying out their decisions, there is nowhere where the teamwork is so clear and so participatory, where if even one person weren't there they would not have succeeded. Most of the time in the Oz books there are actually a lot of potential solutions, given the range of magic they have at their disposal, and everyone's personality kind of blends into everyone else's (although they certainly have defining traits and characteristics) in the sense that anyone could have thought of anything. It's not true in Glinda of Oz. It did occur to me a while ago and re-occurred to me in this book that the Oz books are all a little imperialist. In Baum's world, Ozma rules Oz and all the Ozians by right of the fairy queen passed over Oz and decided to drop Ozma off and make her the ruler (at least that's the latest story; it used to be that Ozma's father used to rule Oz, and I believe in the Ruth Plumly Thompson books that becomes true again) - and this goes even for the people who live within the geographic boundaries of Oz (aka bounded by the Deadly Desert) but who have their own states and don't even know that Oz exists. It is actually presented as the duty of Ozma and her friends to tell people who don't know they're her subjects that in fact they are, and they owe her allegiance and obedience to her laws; and the "good" people always acquiesce with little fuss. Ozma takes the trip to the Skeezers and Flatheads because it is her duty to ensure peace in her realm even when she has no idea who these people are and what they're fighting about, and is pretty sure that they know equally little about her. Does this seem a little White-Man's-Burden-y to anyone else? And then there's that last line - the last line of all of the Baum Oz books, and the only one with an explicit moral, and it really is funny because it's like the moral at the end of an Aesop's fable or something, and it's also kind of interesting and grim, especially given the context in which he wrote the book, and it also, now that the reminiscence of Kipling has occurred to me, strengthens that aspect a little creepily. All that in one tiny sentence! Here it is: "Which proves that it is always wise to do one's duty, however unpleasant that duty may seem to be." Still, it's a strong book in a series I love, and I'm sad to see the end of the Baum ones (although as far as I remember Thompson is actually just as good, and I've already started hers). Good ol' Dorothy is up for anything, as usual - "Whatever happens it's going to be fun - 'cause all excitement is fun - and I wouldn't miss it for the world!" And this book is actually one of the best examples of Baum's seemingly casual but so wonderful habit of having lots of female characters, all of whom are active not just as adventurers but as problem solvers. Looking over whom I mentioned as important to the resolution of the story, they're all but one (Ervic the Skeezer) female, and it is never never commented on. The prominence and complexity and strength of female characters in the Oz books really for me adds up to so much more than do his flaws, that I am willing to forgive him almost anything, and it's not just because of sentiment over books from my youth.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Jinjur

    I had the pleasure of seeing and holding this original printed edition in person. This book is beautiful and, notably, it is the last in the series to be written by Lyman, himself. It is a fantasy story about a magical world with all the happy endings one could hope for.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Grace

    Baum ended his Oz series on a strong note. Many people say that this is the darkest Oz book. I would disagree - "dark" is not the word to describe this story. "Serious," perhaps, and it had a stronger moral message than some others. It also had an actual plot, and the book followed a logical structure, with set-up, complications, rising action, climax, resolution. So many of Baum's books are plotless fairy-land wanderings, so I was pleased with the structure of this story. Glinda and Ozma are the Baum ended his Oz series on a strong note. Many people say that this is the darkest Oz book. I would disagree - "dark" is not the word to describe this story. "Serious," perhaps, and it had a stronger moral message than some others. It also had an actual plot, and the book followed a logical structure, with set-up, complications, rising action, climax, resolution. So many of Baum's books are plotless fairy-land wanderings, so I was pleased with the structure of this story. Glinda and Ozma are the two main protagonists in this tale, and the story gives both of them a chance to grow as complex characters. Their weaknesses as well as their strengths are showcased, which I think helps give this story its power and appeal. Even the almighty Glinda has weaknesses, but in the end she still prevails. The overall moral of the story is "don't fight with your neighbors." But I think that Glinda and Ozma's grace under pressure, their deductive reasoning, and willingness to admit weakness without falling apart is another more subtle lesson. I think that this book would be just as appealing to children as the other lighter, more "fluffy" Oz stories.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Bill

    I found Glinda of Oz by L. Frank Baum purely by chance. I honestly had no idea that Baum had written so many books based on his wondrous world of Oz. Glinda was first published posthumously in 1920. I'm now trying to find other books in the series. In this book, Glinda, while reading her Great Book, discovers troubles between the Flatheads and the Skeezers in northern Oz. She has never heard of either of these people but she worries that people might be harmed in a war. She goes to the Emerald Ci I found Glinda of Oz by L. Frank Baum purely by chance. I honestly had no idea that Baum had written so many books based on his wondrous world of Oz. Glinda was first published posthumously in 1920. I'm now trying to find other books in the series. In this book, Glinda, while reading her Great Book, discovers troubles between the Flatheads and the Skeezers in northern Oz. She has never heard of either of these people but she worries that people might be harmed in a war. She goes to the Emerald City to consult with Princess Ozma, the ruler of Oz. Ozma decides to go to the north, taking along Dorothy, to see what she can do. This begins a quick but grand adventure for the two friends, which will eventually involve all of her other friends, and quite an assortment of strange but wonderful beings they are; Glinda, the Scarecrow, Tin Man and Cowardly Lion, but also Tik Tok, Jack Pumpkinhead, and so many others. Ozma and Dorothy are taken prisoner by the wicked Queen of the Skeezers and her friends have to come and try to save them. And there is your story. Of course, it's a children's fantasy but very entertaining, an easy, comforting and enjoyable read. Put away your troubles for a day or two and enjoy this excellent story and then find the other Oz books.. (4 stars)

  6. 4 out of 5

    Johnny

    I haven’t read an Oz book since my Children’s Literature class back in my early college days. The Wizard of Oz really came to life when I realized that within that well-known children’s story was a political statement on bimetallism (ie. “getting off the gold standard”). Okay, I know that Baum denied it but, come on, silver slippers and yellow brick road—emerald city (ie. greenbacks)! If it wasn’t deliberately written to advocate bimetallism, it’s one of the happiest coincidences in literature. I haven’t read an Oz book since my Children’s Literature class back in my early college days. The Wizard of Oz really came to life when I realized that within that well-known children’s story was a political statement on bimetallism (ie. “getting off the gold standard”). Okay, I know that Baum denied it but, come on, silver slippers and yellow brick road—emerald city (ie. greenbacks)! If it wasn’t deliberately written to advocate bimetallism, it’s one of the happiest coincidences in literature. Anyway, Glinda of Oz came onto my radar because of the new Oz movie coming out and I wondered what kind of political statement it might make. Regardless, I plunged into this piece of children’s literature with the same attitude as Dorothy when she wishes to accompany Queen Ozma on a trip to moderate peace between the Flatheads and the Skeezers. Dorothy says, “Whatever happens it’s going to be fun—‘cause all excitement is fun—and I wouldn’t miss it for the world!” (p. 15) Typing of bimetallism, check out the description of the Flatheads: “Small gold, silver, tin, and iron discs, about the size of pennies, and very thin, were cleverly wired together and made to form knee trousers and jackets for the men and skirts and waists for the women.” (p. 41) But it seems there was a feud between the Flatheads and Skeezers that matched the Hatfields and the McCoys. Neither Flathead nor Skeezer civilization is being run by “legitimate” authority. In this land of magic, it was possible for ambitious leaders to overthrow the legitimate authority by means of dark magic. Hence, you already know that Glinda, the good witch from the original story, is going to be vital in solving the situation. The head of the Skeezers stole power from the “three Adepts” but the citizens privately complain, “…she has used them as the three Adepts never would have done.” Would this sentiment, originally published in 1920, possibly be a commentary on the inhuman weapons of war used in The Great War a few years previously? Between the use of magic and technology with magic, it certainly seems as if Baum is writing a parable on the futility and atrocities of warfare. Of course, if you don’t believe the original story was about bimetallism, you’re sure not going to buy into a pacifist parable, are you? I think Glinda of Oz is remarkably imaginative. The characters are, at times, rather interchangeable and lacking in depth or complexity, but the story and the environment are worth exploring. I’m glad I did explore it and it underscores the fact that my book reviews in college barely scratched the surface of even late 19th century and early 20th children’s literature. Every couple of months, I find a juvenile novel from the 20th century (they weren’t really “young adult” in the early 20th century) with Tom Swift, Dave Dawson, The Sky Detectives, The Hardy Boys, and the Boy Detectives and I have to read them. I think the occasional Oz book could become part of that nostalgia snack reading, as well.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Mitchell

    Good and readable and interesting, but not anything all that special. It would definitely be worth reading aloud. Not sure that the series had enough of a trajectory for me, considering this was Baum's last book. He never ran out of good ideas though. And this one is a bit less of a travelogue. 3.5 of 5.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Jason Pettus

    (Reprinted from the Chicago Center for Literature and Photography [cclapcenter.com:]. I am the original author of this essay, as well as the owner of CCLaP; it is not being reprinted here illegally. This review covers all 14 of the Baum Oz books, which is why it's found on all 14 book pages here.) I think it's fairly safe by now to assume that nearly everyone in Western society is familiar with The Wizard of Oz, most of us because of the classic 1939 movie adaptation; and many realize as well tha (Reprinted from the Chicago Center for Literature and Photography [cclapcenter.com:]. I am the original author of this essay, as well as the owner of CCLaP; it is not being reprinted here illegally. This review covers all 14 of the Baum Oz books, which is why it's found on all 14 book pages here.) I think it's fairly safe by now to assume that nearly everyone in Western society is familiar with The Wizard of Oz, most of us because of the classic 1939 movie adaptation; and many realize as well that author L. Frank Baum ended up penning a whole series of sequels, because of the original book's astounding success back at the turn of the 20th century when it was first published -- 13 sequels altogether, before his death in 1919, which after the movie's success twenty years later became a literal merchandising empire, spawning hundreds more official sequels by various authors and hundreds more unofficial ones once the characters moved into the public domain. And like many others, I've always been interested in what these 14 "canonical" Oz books have to say; and that's why I decided this winter to sit down and read them all in a row for the first time, easy to do because of them being available for free at both Project Gutenberg and the email subscription service DailyLit (which is how I myself read them, and in fact is how I read many of the older books you see reviewed here; I'm a big fan of theirs, and highly recommend them). But of course, to even approach these books with the right mindset, it's important to understand that like so many other one-hit-wonders, Baum was not only eluded by success in most of his other endeavors but was an active failure at them -- in the 1870s, for example, he unsuccessfully tried his hand at breeding fancy poultry (a national fad at the time), then in the 1880s opened his own theatre and became one of the first-ever Americans to produce modern-style stage musicals, apparently a little too ahead of its time, then in the 1890s moved to the Dakota Territory and opened a dry-goods store that eventually failed, as well as starting a newspaper that folded too. So it was sort of a case of random lightning in a bottle when he decided in the late 1890s to try his hand at children's literature, and ended up with his very first title being the most popular kid's book in America for two years straight, and no surprise that Baum then spent the rest of his life desperately trying to figure out how to bottle that lightning again. Because now that I've read it myself, I can confirm that the original Wonderful Wizard of Oz is astonishingly great, a sort of miraculous combination of traits that makes for an almost perfect children's story; and although most of it follows the same storyline seen in the '39 movie, there are also significant differences, making it worth your while to sit and read the book version if you have the interest. (And by the way, for some really interesting reading, check out the academic analysis that was done of this book in the 1960s, arguing that most of its details symbolically correspond almost exactly to various political and economic issues of the late 1800s, including the yellow brick road representing the much-discussed gold standard of that age, the scarecrow representing the then-hot Populist Party, Toto representing the teetotaler [prohibitionist:] movement, and a lot more.) But of course, there are a couple of details about this book that have been forgotten over the decades too, which also help explain its record-shattering success -- it was an unusually lavish book for its time, for example, with two-toned illustrations on every page and several full-color plates, and let's also not forget that Baum himself mounted a Broadway-style musical of Oz just two years after the book was published, a huge hit which toured nationally for a decade and that was even more insanely popular than the book itself (including making national stars out of vaudeville performers Fred Stone and David Montgomery, playing the Scarecrow and Tin Man; the stage production left out the Cowardly Lion altogether, which is why he is also barely seen in any of the 13 canonical sequels). And so that's why when Baum attempted starting up other fantasy series in the wake of Oz's success, hoping to turn all of them into lucrative franchises like the original, the audience mostly responded with yawns; and that's why Baum eventually went back to writing more and more Oz books as the 20th century continued, because by now the strength of the brand far outweighed the relative writing skills of Baum when it came to any particular volume. That's why, at least to adults, it's perhaps actually the introductions to each book that are the most fascinating thing about them; because to be frank, most of the books follow a pretty familiar formula, with a danger-filled quest involving various kooky characters that is usually finished about two-thirds of the way through, followed by a massive parade or party that lets Baum trot out the growing number of main characters added to this universe with each title. (And by the way, prepare yourself for Baum's unending love of the deus-ex-machina plot device; over half the books end along the lines of, "And then our heroes took possession of a super-duper magical device, which they waved in the air and all their troubles went away.") In fact, for those who don't know, that's why the official map of Oz and its surrounding lands eventually grew so large, because Baum still hadn't given up on his dream of having a whole series of kid-lit cash cows out there generating revenue for him, and so would use many of these Oz sequels to introduce entirely new casts of characters who live in entirely new lands, "just over the mountains" or "just past the desert" of Oz itself. By the end of the original 14 books, in fact, Baum had built up a virtual aristocracy of licensable characters, all of whom would have to be dragged out for a cameo at some point in each book to remind the audience of their existence -- not just the cast of the original book and '39 movie but also various other princesses like Ozma and Betsy Bobbin, boy characters like Ojo the Unlucky and Button Bright, adults who help them like the Shaggy Man, Cap'n Bill and Ugu the Shoemaker, and of course a whole litany of quirky fantastical sidekicks, including but not limited to Tik-Tok, Jack Pumpkinhead, the Great Jinjin, Billina the Angry Hen, Scraps the Patchwork Girl, and Polychrome the Rainbow Fairy. Whew! And so did the Great Oz Merchandising Experiment keep limping along for two decades, with each sequel selling less and less and getting lazier and lazier (for example, the tenth book in the series, 1916's Rinkitink in Oz, was actually a non-Oz book written a decade previous, published almost unchanged except for a hasty final chapter full of Oz regulars slapped onto the end); and thus did Baum's bad luck in business come back with a vengeance as well, with three more Broadway productions that were all flops, and even the establishment of a film production company in 1914 that eventually went bankrupt. You can see the progression of all this reflected in Baum's first-person introductions to each book, which like I said is why they might be the most fascinating parts of all for adult readers -- how in the first sequel, for example, he expresses legitimately gleeful surprise and joy at how passionate his fans were, and how thousands of children had literally written to him out of the blue demanding more Oz stories, while with each subsequent sequel his tone becomes more and more snarky, ala "Well, dear and wonderful children, you've yet again demanded another Oz book like the sheep you are, so here it is, you screeching little monsters." In fact, in book six of the series, 1910's The Emerald City of Oz, Baum flat-out states that it's going to be the very last Oz book, and it's no coincidence that many fans actually consider this one to be the best of the original fourteen, because of Baum's extra attention to and enthusiasm for this particular storyline, thinking as he erroneously did that it would be the grand finale of the entire Oz universe; but after his later financial failures forced him back into the Oz business again, the gloves finally come off in his introductions, with most of the rest sounding to today's ears something like, "Well, okay, here again is the sugary teat you all apparently can't get enough of suckling, you infuriating little animals, so open wide and take your medicine." Now, of course, you shouldn't feel too bad for Baum; by the last years of his life, his combined books and plays were generating for him in today's terms roughly a quarter-million dollars a year just in personal royalties. So all in all, an experience I'm glad I had, reading all fourteen original Oz books in a row, but not something I'd recommend to others; instead, maybe better just to read the first, then skip to the sixth, then skip straight to the 14th, 1920's Glinda of Oz, because of its unusual darkness (probably caused, many scholars agree, by Baum knowing that he was near death). As with many authors I've looked at here at CCLaP, history seems to have correctly adjusted itself in Baum's case, with most of his books now rightfully falling into the obscurity they deserve, even while his one true masterpiece is still rightfully recognized as such.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Susan

    This book features Ozma in full diplomatic peacekeeper mode as she embarks on a mission to negotiate between two warring factions in hopes of putting an end to their war and restoring peace to that corner of Oz. Up until now, there have been mentions here and there about her responsibilities in this area, but in practice, we don't really get to see her that hands-on of a ruler. Though she supposedly can see everything in her Magic Picture, she tends to miss a heck of a lot, and often only interv This book features Ozma in full diplomatic peacekeeper mode as she embarks on a mission to negotiate between two warring factions in hopes of putting an end to their war and restoring peace to that corner of Oz. Up until now, there have been mentions here and there about her responsibilities in this area, but in practice, we don't really get to see her that hands-on of a ruler. Though she supposedly can see everything in her Magic Picture, she tends to miss a heck of a lot, and often only intervenes in violations of her rule only when the miscreant in question makes enough of a spectacle that they basically land on her doorstep (or go so far as to imprison one of her best friends) or something equally rash and obvious. Dorothy and company have often come across fractious, bickering groups, but generally Ozma doesn't taken much notice of them. To my recollection, this is the first time she really takes full initiative to mediate an outside situation since the Nome King/Royal Family of Ev issue in Ozma of Oz. So on one hand, this is pretty cool, to see her really act like a ruler, and not just some incredibly well-heeled fairy princess kicking around the Emerald City and having lavish birthday parties like a socialite. She also takes Dorothy with her, and it's really the first time the two of them are traveling on their own, and it's also kind of nice to see them take such a bold and brave step. Girl power! Unfortunately, the drawback with this is that Ozma is just not all that interesting a travel companion. Since the big Tip transformation, she rarely shows much in the way of nuanced personality. She's really more fairy than human, at least as far as the Ozian definition of a fairy: (beautiful, ethereal, not subject to human error, foibles, or flaws, almost always in a positive, sparkling mood). So in this way she's not much of a foil for Dorothy, and the meat of the interest in the story must then be provided by the warring factions themselves. The backstory of the battle and the heart of the conflict is actually kind of interesting, but eventually the pacing gets bogged down by logistics. Like many well-meaning peacekeepers before them, Dorothy and Ozma's good intentions get stymied by the local politics and get them trapped in a strange land. I won't go into too much detail here but trust me that the details of this get very convoluted and get drawn out to almost an --uninentionally--laughable extent before all is said and done. While it's sort of refreshing in a way to not see a quick save for once, this takes it a bit too far in the other direction, perhaps. As appears to be common in many of the Oz books titled after characters, Glinda is in this one very little, and though I noticed the main review basically credited her as making the big save here, I think that's sort of debatable, as you will see for yourself if you read it. Interesting details to watch for: this is the first reference that I came across where Eureka was referred to as a purple kitten (rather than a pink one) and there is a prominent mention of Ginda's magic record book being wrapped in chains. If this was true originally, this part of the description has not been emphasized for some time (I'm guessing this is so it would be more conceivable that it could be stolen in The Lost Princess of Oz).

  10. 5 out of 5

    Benjamin Thomas

    This final book of the Oz series by L. Fran Baum is often categorized as the “darkest” of the original Oz books but I really didn’t find it so. I did see it as a little more complex than most of the others but the fact that the author knew he was dying at the time he wrote it doesn’t contribute to any darkness as far as I can see. In essence, this novel is like most of the others in the series. Several main characters including Dorothy and Ozma, set out to a remote area of Oz because they have fo This final book of the Oz series by L. Fran Baum is often categorized as the “darkest” of the original Oz books but I really didn’t find it so. I did see it as a little more complex than most of the others but the fact that the author knew he was dying at the time he wrote it doesn’t contribute to any darkness as far as I can see. In essence, this novel is like most of the others in the series. Several main characters including Dorothy and Ozma, set out to a remote area of Oz because they have found out that somebody hasn’t recognized that Ozma is the rightful ruler of all Oz and they are not following the laws of the land. (Yes, Oz, my friends is an Imperialist land). In fact, the Skeezers and the Flatheads are actually engaged in war, believe it or not, which is most definitely a violation of the rules. Ozma and Dorothy get trapped and it’s up to their friends, including Glinda to rescue them. Here we do see that Baum likely knew this was his last story because he has nearly all of the major characters from past books make a cameo appearance as they gather to help plan the rescue. This was great to see. Not only familiar recurring characters such as the Scarecrow, Cowardly Lion, the Tin Woodman (Nick Chopper), The Wizard of Oz, Jack Pumpkinhead, Scraps (The Patchwork Girl), etc. but we also see some of the lesser “main” characters that round out Ozma’s Counsellors like Shaggy Man, Tik-Tok, Cap’n Bill, H.M. Wogglebug, and even Dorothy’s Uncle Henry. While the first part of this book was straightforward, I did feel that the major middle section lost its cohesion and sort of fell apart. Solving the predicament of how to rescue Dorothy and Ozma was much more involved than the usual Oz story and required teamwork, lots of ideas, and experimentation. Perhaps this is why some regard this as a “darker” Oz tale. The outcome is not as assured as usual and at one point everybody, including the infallible Glinda feels as if they have exhausted all possibilities. For a child, I suppose, this could be stressful. The final two short chapters were wrapped up at warp speed; I could almost sense Baum’s effort to finish before he drew his last breath. Obviously, there are numerous further adventures in Oz, written by many other authors. I’ve heard many of them are well worth the read, especially those by Baum’s immediate successor, Ruth Plumly Thompson, but alas, I have no plans to pursue them at this time. My goal was to read all of the originals and now that I have done so, I will move on to other things, always remembering my own adventures in Oz fondly.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Smelleykins

    Thats such a pretty cover isn’t it. Too bad I don’t own that particular cover. But anyways. This book. Its the final one in the Oz series, remember there are 14 over all. I’ve read three. Not even in order. This is about Glinda, the good. She is great. Ozma of Oz, who rules all, finds out that there is going to be a war between the flatheads and the skeezers. Ozma has never heard nor seen of these countries in oz. But as she rules the land, she feels it is her duty to prevent the war and make eve Thats such a pretty cover isn’t it. Too bad I don’t own that particular cover. But anyways. This book. Its the final one in the Oz series, remember there are 14 over all. I’ve read three. Not even in order. This is about Glinda, the good. She is great. Ozma of Oz, who rules all, finds out that there is going to be a war between the flatheads and the skeezers. Ozma has never heard nor seen of these countries in oz. But as she rules the land, she feels it is her duty to prevent the war and make everyone get on with each other. She takes Princess Dorothy with her to help, whilst Dorothy is a mortal and does not have any magical powers, Glinda offers her a ring to be worn and turned when she is in danger. We meet a lot of interesting characters a long the way. I loved the Skeezer people. The flatheads were just mean. Glinda is the most powerful sorcerous in all of Oz, and proudly protects all within the land. I believe, as with all the other books, this can very much stand alone. I don’t think its essential to read all previous books, as you can get the gist of the story, but it does help you know the background to Oz. I don’t think the tale of Oz, will ever get old or less enjoyable. For a book that was first printed in 1920, it’s still very much read today

  12. 5 out of 5

    David

    In this, the fourteenth and last of L. Frank Baum's "Oz" books, we find Princess Ozma traveling to a previously unknown part of her realm to prevent war between two of her subject peoples: the Skeezers and the Flatheads., both of whom have come under the power of cruel dictators. the Skeezers live on a domed, submersible island in the middle of a great lake, where they have developed the use of air locks and submarines, all of which work by magic. Given that the book was written around 1918-1919 In this, the fourteenth and last of L. Frank Baum's "Oz" books, we find Princess Ozma traveling to a previously unknown part of her realm to prevent war between two of her subject peoples: the Skeezers and the Flatheads., both of whom have come under the power of cruel dictators. the Skeezers live on a domed, submersible island in the middle of a great lake, where they have developed the use of air locks and submarines, all of which work by magic. Given that the book was written around 1918-1919, just at the end of World War I, the incorporation of the relatively new technology of the under sea boats into the story is not surprising. The fact that the technical details of their operation was no doubt highly classified makes it no surprise that Baum's subs were powered by magic. The Flatheads, who lived at the top of a mountain near the lake of the Skeezers, as their name implies, had heads cut off flat just above the eyebrows. You might wonder how they could think, with no apparent room for brains. No need for worry though, they carried their brains, which had been canned, along with them. As in all the books in the series, despite many problems and difficulties, all works out well in the end. It would be another excellent book to read aloud to your children.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Danns

    And 14 marks the end of L. Frank Baum's run on Oz books. What a fantastic journey, so full of adventure and so fun. This final tale begins with Dorthy and Ozma traveling to the far reaches of the Giliken country to the land of the flatheads and skeezers. There a war is brewing between two societies who have never heard of Ozma's rule. To stave this war, bring peace, and tame the use of magic, Ozma and Dorthy fly to the rescue, and are summarily dismissed and captures by the wicked rules bent on And 14 marks the end of L. Frank Baum's run on Oz books. What a fantastic journey, so full of adventure and so fun. This final tale begins with Dorthy and Ozma traveling to the far reaches of the Giliken country to the land of the flatheads and skeezers. There a war is brewing between two societies who have never heard of Ozma's rule. To stave this war, bring peace, and tame the use of magic, Ozma and Dorthy fly to the rescue, and are summarily dismissed and captures by the wicked rules bent on revenge for past slights inflicting upon one another. How are they rescued? Well I do not want to spoil the story, but it involves a great collection of Oz's famous characters to rush to the aid! While I wish there was more Shaggy Man, because he is the bestest, it was still a fun story and a great ending to the series that Baum wrote. I am eager to see how others keep the canon alive and how their tales compare. But before that, we are going to delve into some of Baum's other tales.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Wilder

    Wow, we did it! My daughter (7 and a half) and I really enjoyed this final book of the Oz series. We loved that Ozma was a main character and that the majority of main players in the story were strong (somewhat) interesting girls/women. It was very "modern" written in 1920? and had an air of "future" to it that was interesting. Our only problem was that Dorothy didn't seem as plucky as usual, easily concerned and frightful for some of the book. There was more bowing down to Ozma as your supreme Wow, we did it! My daughter (7 and a half) and I really enjoyed this final book of the Oz series. We loved that Ozma was a main character and that the majority of main players in the story were strong (somewhat) interesting girls/women. It was very "modern" written in 1920? and had an air of "future" to it that was interesting. Our only problem was that Dorothy didn't seem as plucky as usual, easily concerned and frightful for some of the book. There was more bowing down to Ozma as your supreme ruler that seemed a new change as well. We really loved the ending, it tidied things up nicely without going on and on.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Holli

    This one was a little better than the others, and Ozma is surprising useful in this one. It startled me with how useless she's been throughout the series in relying on everyone else to save her when she actually has something to contribute to the world in general. There was also a lot of suspense in this one and an overlaying "dark-ish" quality to the story. It's sad that it took Mr. Baum becoming so sick that he was able to touch on such dark themes and craft this tale so well. Dorothy is still This one was a little better than the others, and Ozma is surprising useful in this one. It startled me with how useless she's been throughout the series in relying on everyone else to save her when she actually has something to contribute to the world in general. There was also a lot of suspense in this one and an overlaying "dark-ish" quality to the story. It's sad that it took Mr. Baum becoming so sick that he was able to touch on such dark themes and craft this tale so well. Dorothy is still a stuck-up little brat and needs to be put in her place, dropping the book several points for me. As did the abundance of telling in the story.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Emily

    I think this will be my last ever visit to Oz. Three stars because it was one of my favorites as a child, but I had to grit my teeth to get through it reading it aloud to my son. We had a library copy of the Books of Wonder edition, and one nice thing was seeing the full color plates, which my childhood copy lacked.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Garrett Zecker

    Doma Publishing's Wizard of Oz collection has taken me several years to read with my son at bedtime. It was interesting revisiting the texts that I read swiftly through my youth, as I was about his age when I read them and remembered little beyond some of the characters that don't appear in any of the books. I picked up a copy of this version since, for 99c, I could have the complete series along with "All the original artwork by the great illustrator W.W. Denslow (over 1,000 classic illustratio Doma Publishing's Wizard of Oz collection has taken me several years to read with my son at bedtime. It was interesting revisiting the texts that I read swiftly through my youth, as I was about his age when I read them and remembered little beyond some of the characters that don't appear in any of the books. I picked up a copy of this version since, for 99c, I could have the complete series along with "All the original artwork by the great illustrator W.W. Denslow (over 1,000 classic illustrations)", and to read the complete 14-book text at bedtime with all original color illustrations on my Kindle Fire knowing that there would be cross-linked tables of contents and no layout issues, it was worth my buck rather than taking them all out of the library. We read these books before bed at home and under the stars by a campfire in the forest, in a hotel in Montreal and in a seaside cottage in Nova Scotia, on a boat and in a car. We read it everywhere, thanks to the Kindle's mobility. You may be reading this review on one of the individual pages for the original books on Goodreads or Amazon, and if so, all I did was cross-link the books along with the correct dates we read the original texts. The only book I did not cross-link with original dates was the Woggle-bug book, which if you know, is short. Instead, I counted that final book as the review for Doma's Kindle version. You may notice that some books have longer reading spans – probably for two reasons. One, I traded off reading with my wife sometimes, and two, sometimes we needed a little Baum break and read some other books. It did get a little old sometimes, and there are fourteen books totaling 3500 pages in their original library printing. The first thing I think is worth mentioning is that when I first read these books, it was as a child would read them. I remember them being repetitive but familiar. Comforting and revealing. An antiquated adventure, but a serial adventure with recurring characters unparalleled in any other literature. As an adult with an MA in literature (and soon and MFA in fiction), I am actually somewhat unimpressed with the series. Baum wrote a whimsical set of tales, but they are torturously repetitive and would be easy to plug-and-play by replacing characters and moments with a computer to make an entirely new book. But, they are children's books, and we are completely enthralled and comforted by the familiar. Is not Shakespeare the same play-to-play structurally? Are not Pixar or Star Wars movies definitively archetypal in timing, execution, structure, and character so that they can be completely replaced and reapplied to a new story? Even the films – heck, even the trailers - are cut the same, and if you play them all at once, magic happens (see: youtube, "all star wars movies at once"). I suppose where the real magic of these books happens is in their origin. Baum wrote something completely original that took the world by storm and continues to be a whimsical American bellwether for children's fantasy. It is one of the original series specifically for children, spanning fourteen books written almost yearly and gobbled up by a hungry public. It still remains at the forefront of American culture in many revisits in Hollywood (let no one forget the horrific beauty that is Return To Oz) and capitalizing on nostalgia (as recently as six months ago I received a mailing from The Bradford Exchange that was selling original library-bound volumes signed by – get this – Baum's great-grandson... I love an autographed book if only for the idea of the magic it transmits even though it is somewhat meaningless, but maybe someone can convince me where the magic is in having it signed by a probably elderly great-grandchild who likely never met his great-grandfather?). So, while some of the books were awesome and some of them were difficult to slog through, I have my favorites. I will also say that the introductions that each volume opens with were sweet letters from the author to his fans, and it was easy to tell that he truly, truly loved his job writing for children. He knew his audience, he knew what worked, and he sold books. Furthermore, I imagined with great sentimentality mailbags upon mailbags arriving at his house filled to the brim of letters from children all over the world, and the responsibility he probably felt to personally respond to each of them. For my career, that is the best anyone can hope for. What follows is my (and my son's) short reviews of the individual books in the series. The Original and Official Oz Books by L. Frank Baum #1 The Wonderful Wizard of Oz (1900) READ November 26, 2013 – December 1, 2013 My Kid – At first I thought it was crazy, but then it started getting awesome. I remember the movie, but there's a lot of parts that are different. Me – I mean, classic, right? The book pretty much follows the film almost entirely with few exceptions. In hindsight after finishing the entire series, it is worth nothing that it is considerably one of the best books in the series, while many others are of questionable quality. #2 The Marvelous Land of Oz (1904) READ December 1, 2013 – January 9, 2014 My Kid – It was scary... Jack Pumpkinhead and Tip escaped and it was really cool. Me – This is one of the books Return to Oz was based from, The Gump and The Powder of Life coming into play to help Dorothy and Jack Pumpkinhead outwit Mombi. An enjoyable book, quite different than the first book but engineered beautifully with plot and characterization. Enjoyed this one. What was most engaging about this text was Ozma and Tip, and what this book says about gender and youth. I think there is a lot that can be examined about gender at birth and the fluidity of gender as a social construct, witch curse or no. #3 Ozma of Oz (1907) READ January 9, 2014 – February 22, 2014 My Kid – The boat crashes and they have to ride in the box with the chicken... I like TikTok. They saved the Queen. Me – This is the second book that Return to Oz was conceived from and a very engaging book. This one requires more understanding and construction of the Oz Universe including the transformation of several of our characters into ornaments and the outwitting of the Nome King in order to save our friends. This was one of my final favorites before the quality of the books fell, as far as I am concerned. #4 Dorothy and the Wizard in Oz (1908) READ February 22, 2014 – August 12, 2014 My Kid – I kinda forgot this one. There was the vegetable people underground and nothing really happened? Me – Yeah, this one was a bust for me. I think Baum was making some kind of satirical point lost to history... Or maybe the obvious non-referential one, but still, just seemed like the episodic nonsense that didn't have a point most of the time. Keep the beginning, I guess and then skip to the final third, and there's your story. #5 The Road to Oz (1909) READ August 12, 2014 – February 22, 2015 My Kid – The love magnet was pretty awesome, and Dorothy meets the rainbow girl and Shaggy man... I guess I'll leave off there. Me – Another one that I thought was a little redundant and repetitive without much of a point. They get lost, they make it back, there are some weird artifacts that help them... Meh. I did like the new characters, however, who make many more appearances in the future books. Shaggy Man and Polychrome are great. #6 The Emerald City of Oz (1910) READ February 22, 2015 – September 14, 2015 My Kid – The Emerald City was cool and Dorothy was in charge. If I lived there I would sell it all and be rich. There was a war. Me – This one was pretty good until the end, where everything was buttoned up (apologies, button bright) pretty quickly without there being much of a solid reason. The conflicts were all contrived and there were some more ridiculously ridiculous new characters who never showed up again in the series. A great diversion, but with little substance toward the end. #7 The Patchwork Girl of Oz (1913) READ September 14, 2015 – December 22, 2015 My Kid – It was pretty weird how the quilt doll became a patchwork girl and she was really funny. In the end, it didn't matter that they found all the stuff, so it was kinda crazy and funny. Me – This was relatively silly. I enjoyed it, and the Patchwork Girl is a character I can really get behind as a foil to some of the other characters and somewhat mischievous. The plot is ridiculous, but the powder of life and the glass cat are somewhat illuminating elements of this text. Scraps made this a fun one. #8 Tik-Tok of Oz (1914) READ December 22, 2015 – April 2, 2016 My Kid – The whole story of the shaggy man's brother being missing and ugly didn’t make sense, but... there was a war and Tik Tok was rescued. There was a man who was not as evil as the other army general guys. It was weird. Me – This one was primarily about The Shaggy Man and his adventure to resolve a variety of political and interconnected issues happening surrounding everyone's messing around with the Nome King. There is a huge tube that goes through the center of the earth that everything centers on, and Shaggy is trying to get the Nome King to release his brother the whole time. There are a lot of characterization, detail, and plot errors in this that postdate some facts from the earlier books – which is kind of weird – and the intrigue surrounding the plot is somewhat complicating for kids. What I thought was the coolest element was the character of Quox, who passes more than a coincidental resemblance to Catbus from Miyazaki's Totoro. #9 The Scarecrow of Oz (1915) READ April 2, 2016 – September 1, 2016 My Kid – First of all, there's a lot of people getting lost. Second, if I was in Jinxland, I think I would rather be back in oz. Me – This one was interesting as it had little to do with The Scarecrow and was mainly about Button Bright, Cap'n Bill, and Trot. This one is probably the height of the ridiculousness, with little shallow plot item after little shallow plot item heaped upon one another. At the end, The Scarecrow has to (and succeeds) in recapturing Jinxland for Gloria, its rightful ruler, and returns to the Emerald City for a celebration. Eh... #10 Rinkitink in Oz (1916) READ September 1, 2016 – December 1, 2016 My Kid – All these books have someone wicked in them and it's so crazy. I liked the name Kaliko, and the way Dorothy comes to the rescue of everyone being clever solves the problem. What's with all the problems? I feel like there's thousands. Me – This one was pretty good, as it seemed to deviate from the regular universe of Oz and focus on a different set of locations and characters. It had a very Tolkienian feel in terms of plot, structure, and internal political commentary. It felt very different from the others, and most elements in the text had a point and a long-term purpose. I enjoyed this one. #11 The Lost Princess of Oz (1917) READ December 1, 2016 – January 19, 2017 My Kid – First of all, they've gotta be responsible for the diamond pan, and that's why they lost it. They weren't responsible. At the end they searched for the tools and didn't need them and it was useless. Me – Lost Princess was fun. It surrounded the story of Ozma being kidnapped and the Wizard, Button Bright, Trot, and Betsy Bobbin to go rescue her. Everything in this one felt a little random, but it all ties back together in the end. This one was pretty diversionary but not as bad as some of the others. #12 The Tin Woodman of Oz (1918) READ January 19, 2017 – March 13, 2017 My Kid – Woot is a weird name, and everyone was changed to animals and monkeys and none of them matched up. It was all pretty weird because they all had their new needs as animals and it didn't match with what they were. The love story was kinda weird since the girl didn't want the tin woodmen anymore and the fact that they left and it was all for nothing didn't make sense. Me – A lot of randomness in this one as well, but there is a love story at its core as we learn of a twin brother that the Tin Woodman had all along who shares the love of a long lost young lady named Nimee Amee. A lot of diversionary stories, adventures, and one cool twist by the end, and everyone arrives back where they started. Not the best, but entertaining. This one, while random at times, was a quality read. #13 The Magic of Oz (1919) READ March 13, 2017 – April 25, 2017 My Kid – I wish you could transform yourself. Like... What if you wanted to turn yourself into a pea shooter from Plants Vs Zombies? I don't even know how to pronounce the word. I never heard of it, this nonsense word. Me – This one had a funny gimmick in it with a secret word that when spoken could turn anyone into anything. There is a war on, and a secret force is transforming monkeys into superhuman soldiers (and there is a complication that no one in oz can be hurt but what happens when someone is chopped into a hundred living pieces?). This one was enjoyable, but the gimmick is honestly the only thing holding it all together. #14 Glinda of Oz (1920) READ April 25, 2017 – May 23, 2017 My Kid – This one was kinda like a world of them figuring out what is going on with the big glass house-world under-water. The opposite of everything and they couldn't figure out how to get it back to normal, so what was going on with the war the whole time? Then they fix it. Everything is all set. Me – This posthumous volume seemed to be pieced together from notes, as there is a clear difference between the tone of prior volumes and this one. The cadence and structure of the language and story is quite different in parts, and I found it takes itself seriously by comparison. Beautiful art and architecture present this journey, and I have to say, the fact that this was in new hands really shows because there is some wonderful structure that is absent in the other volumes, as well as even reintroductions to the characters when they show up. The end was a little too tidy with another deus ex machina, but the fact that it came from something that was surprising and there all along was different. *BONUS Oz Works by L. Frank Baum, 'the Royal Historian of Oz' The Woggle-Bug Book (1905) READ May 23, 2017 – May 24, 2017 My Kid – Actually, I don't have a review for my kid... See below. Me – This book started cute and had a cute premise. When I began reading it at bedtime, the kid had fallen asleep. I tend to keep reading and save our spot, and then pick it up where he fell asleep the next night. Lucky for me, the terrifyingly racist parlance in this book started after he fell asleep. I read through to the end, with no intention of going back with him tomorrow... It was... shockingly indifferent to complete disregard for everyone. From switching between "Oriental" and "Chinaman" and having a character with a dialect that wasn't just a stereotype but also a stereotype of a racist's impression wasn't nearly as bad as the way Baum used the N-word (and had the character as a monkey's monkey). It was offensive and seemed ridiculously gratuitous for even the time it was published. Not a shining moment for his work at all... But it was pretty cool to learn the Woggle Bug was from Boston, anyway. This one was pretty awful.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Carlie

    Maybe it is just knowing it is the last book but for some reason I never really enjoy the last book in a series. The Hunger Games is an exception. I knew this was the last book and I had some preconceived ideas about it. It was a really good book though and it makes me sad to think there are no more oz books. I love these books primarily because they are pure imagination. They are not like Alice in Wonderland which is pure nonsense. These stories make sense and they are so full of imagination. T Maybe it is just knowing it is the last book but for some reason I never really enjoy the last book in a series. The Hunger Games is an exception. I knew this was the last book and I had some preconceived ideas about it. It was a really good book though and it makes me sad to think there are no more oz books. I love these books primarily because they are pure imagination. They are not like Alice in Wonderland which is pure nonsense. These stories make sense and they are so full of imagination. The different people and adventures they go on are creative and fun. To have such an imagination is something to be treasured and valued. The story starts off with Dorothy and Ozma looking at Glinda's great record book. In it they discover that the flatheads and skeezers are about to go to war. This of course is against the law and Dorothy and Ozma set out at once to prevent this war. The girls have never heard of skeezers or the flatheads so they must have never heard of Dorothy or Ozma. When the girls arrive at the flatheads home they learn that the flatheads are a bunch of people who have no brains. There heads are as flat as a pancake. They keep all their brains in a can. The King and Queen of the flatheads had stolen brains from other people, so they could become smart enough to perform magic. They wanted to fish out of this lake at the bottom of the mountain that they lived on. Only the ruler of the skeezers the great Co-Eeh-Hoo wouldn't allow them to do that. So when the flathead rulers came to the lake the ruler of the skeezers turned the queen flathead into a bronze pig. Ozma and Dorothy decided they needed to pay a visit to this Co-Eeh-Hoo. Both the skeezers and flatheads were practicing magic illegally as well. When Dorothy and Ozma made it to the lake they discovered the home of the Skeezers was on an island in the middle of the lake. A boat was sent out to retrieve them. They met the great ruler of the Skeezers, who haughtily told them they were prisoners now. She did not care if Ozma ruled all of Oz. They were put in charge of the Lady Aurux who took them to her home and explained how Co-Eeh-Hoo had learned her magic. She had invited Three Adepts of Magic to her palace and after learning some magic from them turned them into fish and threw them into the lake. She then stole all their magical things. The next day the flatheads came down from the mountain to wage war. The first thing Co-Eeh-Hoo did was to submerge the island underwater so the flatheads could not attack the island. She then set out in boats with her soldiers to conquer the flatheads. The flathead king was rather clever though and had made a potion in a pot that would transform Co-Eeh-Hoo. He threw it on her and she turned into a swan. As soon as she was transformed she forgot all her magic and was only concerned with being a swan. That was not good because Co-Eeh-Hoo used magic to raise and lower the island, to send out boats and to extend the bridge. Dorothy and Ozma were trapped until help came and the men in boats were trapped outside of the island. Glinda though read all this in her great book of records and immediately called together a council. Everyone decided the best thing would be to go to there and try and rescue Ozma and Dorothy. Meanwhile the three adepts of magic acquired the help of a Skeezer to take them to a sorceress in the woods. By tricking her, he was able to get her to transform the adepts back into their rightful forms. When the adepts and the skeezer made it back Glinda and everyone were already there. It took some thinking but Scraps finally came up with a plan of draining the lake. Of course that would kill the fish but if they drained it enough to get to the dome, they would be able to cut a hole in it and lower themselves down with rope. This worked out perfect but no one knew any of the magic words. Glinda tried all kinds of things until Dorothy suggested it might be Co-Eeh-Hoo's name. Thy tested it out and sure enough each part of Co-Eeh-Hoo's name did something. They were able to raise the island and extend the bridge. Ozma appointed lady Aurux the new ruler of the Skeezer's. As for the flatheads, Glinda sewed their brains back into their heads so no one could steal each other's brains. The queen was transformed back and the rulers ruled but no longer with magic. Everyone went home safe and happy.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Michael Tildsley

    I have a few things to say about this last Baum Oz book besides my usual, "This was really good," and "Can't believe it's almost 100 years old," and "Suck on that, Sponge Bob!" I feel like everyone has been looking in the wrong place for Baum's political and social commentary. Everyone I know of points to the original novel, The Wonderful Wizard of Oz, as this commentary. I believe that they arrived 13 books too soon to the party. To start off with, people tend to say that this book is "darker" th I have a few things to say about this last Baum Oz book besides my usual, "This was really good," and "Can't believe it's almost 100 years old," and "Suck on that, Sponge Bob!" I feel like everyone has been looking in the wrong place for Baum's political and social commentary. Everyone I know of points to the original novel, The Wonderful Wizard of Oz, as this commentary. I believe that they arrived 13 books too soon to the party. To start off with, people tend to say that this book is "darker" than other Oz books. Well, it features a war happening in a place distant from the Emerald City about which Ozma, the ruler of Oz, is oblivious. I believe that Baum is discussing his thoughts on WWI through this book, and that his symbolism is way more obvious than the theories I've heard about book one of Oz, and the gold standard. For starters, the war is between two camps of people, the Skeezers and the Flatheads. The Skeezers live on an island ruled by a monarch (England?). They have relied on three magic adepts (Christian Holy Trinity?) to keep peace between themselves and the Flatheads, who are anatomically different from other people of Oz as they have no brains (people under the British Empire?). By the end of the book, Ozma, Glinda, and the good people of the Emerald City (Americans?) have ended the war, and given brains back to the Flatheads, making them equals to everyone else. Also of note, the monarch of the Skeezers is replaced by a just and fair woman, and the position of "Prime Minister" (Baum's words) is created for the man who, during the conflict, followed the EXACT advice given by the three adepts. I didn't know that I'd have this much to say about an Oz book, but I'm glad I do. I have a good feeling that Baum knew this would be his last book, and it is here that he put in his last impressions of the world he saw, and caricaturing the "Great War" that we had just faced. ** Thoughts on the Series ** The series as a whole is pretty great, really. I'm sad that this is the last "real" Oz book, though I do have some Oz wonder tales left to read. My lasting impression is the practicality and tone of voice Baum has as an author writing to children, his unwavering care for his characters' safety, as well as his lack of mercy that evil be punished. Baum's writings always seem to have a straight-and-narrow, clear path to them, not hindered by distraction or fanciful aside. He has an economy of language, and if it's on paper, it's there for a reason. I can see him in more of a practical social role, such as teacher or banker. It's hard for me to picture Baum as an actor, playwright, and otherwise creator of art. Baum's built a legacy that will always stand, and lead the way for many a dreamer to follow.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Robyn

    Interesting, not just following some pattern of "typical" Oz stories. I stayed interested in how they would solve the situation. It was neat that Ozma just wanted to get to know and help her subjects. And I liked how she said that all of the "legally registered/authorized" practitioners of magic arts all knew different forms of magic, so it wasn't like one person knew everything, but they had ways of combining their knowledge. Maybe they should've started a school of magic arts, where each of th Interesting, not just following some pattern of "typical" Oz stories. I stayed interested in how they would solve the situation. It was neat that Ozma just wanted to get to know and help her subjects. And I liked how she said that all of the "legally registered/authorized" practitioners of magic arts all knew different forms of magic, so it wasn't like one person knew everything, but they had ways of combining their knowledge. Maybe they should've started a school of magic arts, where each of them (Ozma, the Wizard, & Glinda) could each be professors & teach classes. I liked how they all combined their knowledge bases to solve the problem of the sunken island.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Tony Laplume

    The final Oz from L. Frank Baum finally puts Ozma and Glinda directly in the spotlight, and on that alone proves a worthwhile addition to the series. Frequently supporting characters and perhaps more frequently part of Baum's penchant for employing the classic deus ex machina method for his endings, these are in any respects the most powerful women in the stories. Ozma came second (Marvelous Land of Oz), but she quickly eclipsed Glinda (the Good Witch) in significance, so it's perhaps appropriate The final Oz from L. Frank Baum finally puts Ozma and Glinda directly in the spotlight, and on that alone proves a worthwhile addition to the series. Frequently supporting characters and perhaps more frequently part of Baum's penchant for employing the classic deus ex machina method for his endings, these are in any respects the most powerful women in the stories. Ozma came second (Marvelous Land of Oz), but she quickly eclipsed Glinda (the Good Witch) in significance, so it's perhaps appropriate that for most of the book, she's more important to the plot, as she finally sets out on one of those endless series of adventures that typify life in Oz. On a visit to Glinda, she and Dorothy happen to discover that there's another conflict arising in those pesky remote regions. Watching Ozma lead one of these parties is a true revelation. She earns her distinction as the wisest person in Oz (there were plenty of contenders introduced throughout the series, none of them coming off as this impressive, with all due apologies to fans of the Scarecrow) as she navigates a typical series of obstacles. Meanwhile, we find out what it looks like when Glinda goes on the job, too. She comes off less impressively, but also stands as the final example of Baum's impression of what practical magic looks like. Modern readers have Harry Potter as a guide, not to mention countless superheroes. We often can't imagine a hero being truly stymied. Yet that's exactly what happens to Glinda, who finally succeeds in finding a solution to the problem at hand by listening to the advice of the very kind of eccentrics we've been following all along. So this, the final book in the Oz canon written by Baum himself, acknowledges both the authorities and the upstarts. You might call it squarely American. Baum skirted around his thought process so much, he led most of his fans to believe that these were mere fairy tales. More like allegories. His edge may have softened by the end, the more the real world horned in on his imagination (the early books are littered with the portents of WWI, while in the latter, direct reflections on it and its aftermath), but in the end Baum roundly proves that there was far more on his mind than nonsense. Figures that it was the clown-like Patchwork Girl who helps prove that once and for all.

  22. 4 out of 5

    hpboy13

    I only wish that there were more Oz books from Baum, because he has a 14 for 14 track record. ETA 2018: The Oz series definitely goes out on a high note in Glinda of Oz, as Baum gets back to basics and gives several characters their due. When we originally fell in love with Oz, it was a land of cruel rulers subjugating their people with magic – here, we return to that concept, and up the stakes. There is a genuine problem here that actually consumes the characters, rather than the usual “oh, let’s I only wish that there were more Oz books from Baum, because he has a 14 for 14 track record. ETA 2018: The Oz series definitely goes out on a high note in Glinda of Oz, as Baum gets back to basics and gives several characters their due. When we originally fell in love with Oz, it was a land of cruel rulers subjugating their people with magic – here, we return to that concept, and up the stakes. There is a genuine problem here that actually consumes the characters, rather than the usual “oh, let’s wander through Oz and see what we can see” plotlines. We also return to the characters that started it all: Dorothy, the Wizard, and Ozma. Most crucial of all, Ozma gets to go on an adventure for literally the first time since Book 3, Ozma of Oz. Turns out, when she leaves her royal palace she becomes a much more bearable character. We also get Glinda into the action for the first time since Book 2, The Marvelous Land of Oz, and she definitely brings a powerful energy to the proceedings. The rest of Oz’s sprawling cast of characters is relegated to filling out the background scenery, which is where they’re preferred. Instead we get several new characters – I especially liked Ervic, the Skeezer who keeps his wits about him in a crisis and gets stuff done. I’d like to take a moment to discuss the Oz series as a whole, having now completed a reread. Oz was my first fandom, and I reread these books obsessively as a kid. Revisiting them as an adult, I was filled with some trepidation for whether the magic would be ruined. I am immensely relieved, then, to say these books are just as enchanting as I remember them. To be sure, there are a few weak links – especially the middle books where it was clear Baum had no desire to keep working on them. But all told, it’s still a wonderful fantastical world that I loved spending time in… even if I maintain that Ozma is the real villain of the piece!

  23. 4 out of 5

    Ds

    ITA-ENG "If every one could wave a wand and have his wants fulfilled there would be little to wish for. There would be no eager striving to obtain the difficult, for nothing would then be difficult and the pleasure of earning something longed for, and only to be secured by hard work and careful thought, would be utterly lost." Mi aspettavo qualcosa di diverso dall'ultimo libro, ma non per questo ne sono rimasta delusa. La storia mi è piaciuta moltissimo e la trama è stata costruita in modo intel ITA-ENG "If every one could wave a wand and have his wants fulfilled there would be little to wish for. There would be no eager striving to obtain the difficult, for nothing would then be difficult and the pleasure of earning something longed for, and only to be secured by hard work and careful thought, would be utterly lost." Mi aspettavo qualcosa di diverso dall'ultimo libro, ma non per questo ne sono rimasta delusa. La storia mi è piaciuta moltissimo e la trama è stata costruita in modo intelligente. Forse avrei preferito che il libro si concentrasse più sui personaggi già conosciuti (magari in festeggiamenti e racconti di storie passate) che su nuovi personaggi, per quanto siano interessanti. Sono rimasta affascinata dai nuovi posti descritti e mi ha fatto piacere scoprire più cose sulle regole magiche di Oz. Si conclude qui l'avventura e nonostante sia triste, è giunta l'ora perché la serie è stata portata avanti fra troppi alti e bassi e questo è un buon capitolo con cui concludere il tutto. I was expecting something different from the last book, but I was not disappointed. I like the story and the plot was carried on in an intelligent way. I would have preferred the book to focus on the old characters (maybe all of them celebrating something and telling each other past adventures) rather than on new ones, even if they were interesting. I was fascinated by the new places and I was happy to discover more about the laws of Oz and its magic. So the adventures came to an end and even if I'm, I know it's time cause the series was brought on through ups and downs and this is a good installment to finish the adventures.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Rebecca Timberlake

    In the final installment of the Oz Series, we get to see Glinda and Ozma in action in a way we don't typically see them. We also get Scraps, Dorothy, Uncle Henry and the rest shining in new ways, which adds something interesting to moments that would otherwise be boring. This story isn't anything special compared to other books in the series, and characters make decisions and speeches that are predictable (it's a children's book, so what more can we really expect?), but it's still a fitting end In the final installment of the Oz Series, we get to see Glinda and Ozma in action in a way we don't typically see them. We also get Scraps, Dorothy, Uncle Henry and the rest shining in new ways, which adds something interesting to moments that would otherwise be boring. This story isn't anything special compared to other books in the series, and characters make decisions and speeches that are predictable (it's a children's book, so what more can we really expect?), but it's still a fitting end to the series. Especially when you consider Glinda actually gets out and about and is helpful. My biggest annoyance was probably that a chunk of the middle was used to sum up all of the characters before continuing with the action. I realize these can be read out of order, and since they were for kids it accommodates their need for a refresher, but whole paragraphs were used just to describe characters, and in some cases not the way they were described previously. I just felt like a brief summary for the characters would have been better, and placed where the character came in, not all at once ahead of any of them speaking. My ratings for the series: Book One- three stars Book Two- three stars Book Three- four stars Book Four- three stars Book Five- three stars Book Six- four stars Book Seven- four stars Book Eight- three stars Book Nine- two stars Book Ten- five stars Book Eleven- four stars Book Twelve- three stars Book Thirteen- four stars Book Fourteen- three stars Series Overall- 3.4 stars- rounded up to four stars

  25. 4 out of 5

    Julia

    This was actually a somewhat interesting book for Baum since he again changed the style of his writing in this book. In all the other books Dorothy can seem like a rotten brat who is full of herself, a bully at times and just a very mature character with all the crazy adventures she ends up - mostly indirectly, sometimes directly. And in this book she is once more relegated to being a child with childish issues and for once her peers are actually concerned about her getting in danger while in t This was actually a somewhat interesting book for Baum since he again changed the style of his writing in this book. In all the other books Dorothy can seem like a rotten brat who is full of herself, a bully at times and just a very mature character with all the crazy adventures she ends up - mostly indirectly, sometimes directly. And in this book she is once more relegated to being a child with childish issues and for once her peers are actually concerned about her getting in danger while in the other books they seemed to welcome her brazen spontaneous jumps. In keeping with the rhythm of the book there were a few flaws one of which I found interesting was the color of Dorothy's kitten kept changing wherever she may have appeared within the story as a by-product (definitely not a character to be enjoyed as she was in her introductory storyline). The other thing is the plot was a bit too complicated and awkward for being an Oz book. You were being bounced around too much while there were interesting side events that would have made for some interesting stories to follow if Baum had written yet another. And the thing that just disturbed me was one of the leaving graphics of opening a can of somewhat unknown aged-preserved brains to slather on the top of someone's head to give them brains. Gives me the heebie-jeebies. I am thankful to be done with this series and I cannot see how it has reached the acclaim that it has. It will be a long time, if never, since I read these again.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Joshua Gross

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. OMG I am finally done with these damn books (at least the ones by L. Frank Baum and those are the only ones I'm reading)! And this one was a lot better than the other ones. The first thing that startled me was the intelligent conversation that Ozma and Dorothy and Glinda were having. I think that was a first. Also, it was a really compelling storyline. Ozma finds out about a war brewing between the mountainous flatheads and the lake-dwelling Skeezers, and feels it's her responsibility to make pe OMG I am finally done with these damn books (at least the ones by L. Frank Baum and those are the only ones I'm reading)! And this one was a lot better than the other ones. The first thing that startled me was the intelligent conversation that Ozma and Dorothy and Glinda were having. I think that was a first. Also, it was a really compelling storyline. Ozma finds out about a war brewing between the mountainous flatheads and the lake-dwelling Skeezers, and feels it's her responsibility to make peace between them and inform these backwoods people that she's their ruler. This doesn't go well. The Su-Dic of the Flatheads tries to imprison them, and the Queen of the Skeezers does imprison them, then lowers the dome-covered city to the bottom of the lake, trapping them there when she goes and gets herself turned into a swan by the Su-Dic. No one knows how to reverse her magic, or get the city up above the water again. There's three adepts at magic that were turned into fish that once ruled over the land until the Queen stole their magic and changed them to fish. The Emerald City rescue party lead by the Wizard hopes to find the fish and restore the adepts, thus being able to have them raise the city and rescue their friends and punish the Flatheads. I was really entertained, and glad the books ended with such a good story. Also, the patchwork girl of Oz aka "Scraps" is by far one of the most entertaining characters in the series.

  27. 4 out of 5

    David

    Story: While visiting Glinda the Good Dorothy and Ozma learn that two people, the Flatheads and the Skeezers, are about to go to war with each other. Not wanting this to happen Ozma and Dorothy set out to make peace with the two nations. Along the way Dorothy learns some more about how magic works, and that everyone who can use magic has their limits. They have some adventures and mishaps along the way, but thanks to their friends and the good hearts of Oz's inhabitants everything manages to work Story: While visiting Glinda the Good Dorothy and Ozma learn that two people, the Flatheads and the Skeezers, are about to go to war with each other. Not wanting this to happen Ozma and Dorothy set out to make peace with the two nations. Along the way Dorothy learns some more about how magic works, and that everyone who can use magic has their limits. They have some adventures and mishaps along the way, but thanks to their friends and the good hearts of Oz's inhabitants everything manages to work out well. This book features some elements that are usually not present in the books of Oz, like two people threatening war with each other, and Ozma and Dorothy both unable to figure a way out of a certain predicament. I think it does work because it allows their friends to come and help them. I also enjoy the philosophy L. Frank Baum puts in this book about magic because it holds true. While I found the Flatheads a little weird it still has that Oz feel about them. Caution: Spiders hold people captive, which may be a little scary. People threaten war with each other. A transforming witch might scare some. Lessons: We should always strive for peace. When we work hard for something we want we find joy in having accomplished what we set out to do. We should use our gifts and talents to help each other instead of ourselves.

  28. 5 out of 5

    S. W.

    Glinda of Oz is about a war between the skeezers and the flatheads, two peoples that the land of Oz knows little about because they are isolated. The flatheads have flat heads with brains at their side in cans that can be stolen, given away, or lost. The final moral/ark is that Glinda decides the flatheads need more then peace to be happy, they have to have 'normal' heads with brains under their skulls like everyone else... She makes them 'normal and pretty' and then tells them they must be rena Glinda of Oz is about a war between the skeezers and the flatheads, two peoples that the land of Oz knows little about because they are isolated. The flatheads have flat heads with brains at their side in cans that can be stolen, given away, or lost. The final moral/ark is that Glinda decides the flatheads need more then peace to be happy, they have to have 'normal' heads with brains under their skulls like everyone else... She makes them 'normal and pretty' and then tells them they must be renamed the mountaineers to fit their new looks... As someone who has never picked up an L. Frank Baum book, this was a very very disappointing ending... The only reason I"m going back to read the "Wizard of Oz" (The first of his 14 books officially in the series), is because I want to see if the first few books also have screwed up morals... What's also interesting to me, is that the intro written by the author himself says that Oz books are to be 'modern fairy tales' that have no morals and no lessons to learn -- just fantasy and whimsy for children... well, the 14th book most certainly had a moral, and it was a bad one! The WHOLE book is about learning that lesson, so I guess what I'm saying is... it sucked... and so does the lesson the author was trying to convey! But don't take my word for it -- read the book -- free on Amazon.com! It's a VERY quick read (less then a few hours)

  29. 5 out of 5

    Will Waller

    It's over! It's over! The foray into children's lit and specifically the world of Oz is over for me! It's been a strange journey, but one that I've ultimately enjoyed. Reading all of the Baum books on Oz have given me a greater appreciation for one of the major voices in American Fantasy writing and the development of a genre in America. Bravo Mr. Baum...well, if bravos could reach across the lost cold grave. This book was the best, hands down. It had a thick(ish) plot, the characters were in vas It's over! It's over! The foray into children's lit and specifically the world of Oz is over for me! It's been a strange journey, but one that I've ultimately enjoyed. Reading all of the Baum books on Oz have given me a greater appreciation for one of the major voices in American Fantasy writing and the development of a genre in America. Bravo Mr. Baum...well, if bravos could reach across the lost cold grave. This book was the best, hands down. It had a thick(ish) plot, the characters were in vast array and their characteristics were not muddled by their varied appearances, and the book seems to have a strong ending. Baum apparently thought this would be his last, so he pulled out almost all the characters that he had introduced and had them do their thang. Mostly, I enjoyed this book because it was a bit more complex than others. It also mirrored somewhat the world's unsettled tone during WWI. Factions attacking other factions; one of the factions trying to isolate themselves while others, with no brains at all, trying to poison the waters. Symbolism? Yeah buddy. Frankly, I'm excited to have done all the books because it gives me a sense of Baum's worth in the literary world. He created a world, not just a scene, and to that we thank you. Now...on to other readings and new worlds!

  30. 5 out of 5

    Thomas

    IT WAS STUPENDOUS!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! IT WAS STUPENDOUS!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

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