kode adsense disini
Hot Best Seller

Never Stop Walking: A Memoir of Finding Home Across the World

Availability: Ready to download

An extraordinary memoir of one woman’s fight to find her true self between the life into which she was born and the one she was given. Christiana Mara Coelho was born into extreme poverty in Brazil. After spending the first seven years of her life with her loving mother in the forest caves outside São Paulo and then on the city streets, where they begged for food, she and h An extraordinary memoir of one woman’s fight to find her true self between the life into which she was born and the one she was given. Christiana Mara Coelho was born into extreme poverty in Brazil. After spending the first seven years of her life with her loving mother in the forest caves outside São Paulo and then on the city streets, where they begged for food, she and her younger brother were suddenly put up for adoption. When one door closed on the only life Christiana had ever known and on the woman who protected her with all her heart, a new one opened. As Christina Rickardsson, she’s raised by caring adoptive parents in Sweden, far from the despairing favelas of her childhood. Accomplished and outwardly “normal,” Christina is also filled with rage over what she’s lost and having to adapt to a new reality while struggling with the traumas of her youth. When her world falls apart again as an adult, Christina returns to Brazil to finally confront her past and unlock the truth of what really happened to Christiana Mara Coelho. A memoir of two selves, Never Stop Walking is the moving story of the profound love between families and one woman’s journey from grief and loss to survival and self-discovery.


Compare
kode adsense disini

An extraordinary memoir of one woman’s fight to find her true self between the life into which she was born and the one she was given. Christiana Mara Coelho was born into extreme poverty in Brazil. After spending the first seven years of her life with her loving mother in the forest caves outside São Paulo and then on the city streets, where they begged for food, she and h An extraordinary memoir of one woman’s fight to find her true self between the life into which she was born and the one she was given. Christiana Mara Coelho was born into extreme poverty in Brazil. After spending the first seven years of her life with her loving mother in the forest caves outside São Paulo and then on the city streets, where they begged for food, she and her younger brother were suddenly put up for adoption. When one door closed on the only life Christiana had ever known and on the woman who protected her with all her heart, a new one opened. As Christina Rickardsson, she’s raised by caring adoptive parents in Sweden, far from the despairing favelas of her childhood. Accomplished and outwardly “normal,” Christina is also filled with rage over what she’s lost and having to adapt to a new reality while struggling with the traumas of her youth. When her world falls apart again as an adult, Christina returns to Brazil to finally confront her past and unlock the truth of what really happened to Christiana Mara Coelho. A memoir of two selves, Never Stop Walking is the moving story of the profound love between families and one woman’s journey from grief and loss to survival and self-discovery.

30 review for Never Stop Walking: A Memoir of Finding Home Across the World

  1. 5 out of 5

    Goth Gone Grey

    Life is fickle. Honest, emotional, compelling. Perhaps for the first chapter, I didn't get into the flow of this book. The writing seemed stilted, unemotional, cold descriptions of a child's memories. Then, suddenly, I tumbled into the author's world headlong, completely engrossed and not wanting to put the book down. The narrative shifts among time, place, and mood beautifully. It shows the determination to survive as a street kid in Brazil, and the culture shock of a sudden uprooting to a new Life is fickle. Honest, emotional, compelling. Perhaps for the first chapter, I didn't get into the flow of this book. The writing seemed stilted, unemotional, cold descriptions of a child's memories. Then, suddenly, I tumbled into the author's world headlong, completely engrossed and not wanting to put the book down. The narrative shifts among time, place, and mood beautifully. It shows the determination to survive as a street kid in Brazil, and the culture shock of a sudden uprooting to a new family and new home in Sweden. The book is rich with life's moments that resonate worldwide: poverty, wealth, abuse, kindness, violence, tenderness, death, life, despair, and hope. The recurring theme of mothering and the strength of friends was both touching and hauntingly sad in turns. The tale the author tells us not an easy one. She lays herself bare, sharing even the most horrific moments and nightmares of her life, and the (quite literally) soaring heights as well. Were this an American memoir, it would include references to PTSD and therapy to cope - understandable, and no shame in either. Here the author finds her own techniques, including using her experiences to help others. Kudos to her for sharing her tale and using it for positive change. I will be rereading this, as I'm sure my rapid fire swiping reading to find out what would happen next caused me to miss some of the richness and elegance of the text. The translator also deserves mention - were it not for names I'm unused to reading, I would have thought I was reading it in the language it was written in. Nicely done.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Iso Melo

    As a Brazilian, one year younger than the author, I need to clarify some points. I understand her pain and her suffering, but as she was a kid, she did not understand the historical and economic context. In the end of 80s, Brazil faced one of the worst economic crisis of the History of Economy. Until that moment, it was the second worst of the History (compared to Germany after First World War). Inflation reached more 1000% per month and we were the most unequal country of the world. I am white As a Brazilian, one year younger than the author, I need to clarify some points. I understand her pain and her suffering, but as she was a kid, she did not understand the historical and economic context. In the end of 80s, Brazil faced one of the worst economic crisis of the History of Economy. Until that moment, it was the second worst of the History (compared to Germany after First World War). Inflation reached more 1000% per month and we were the most unequal country of the world. I am white and privileged and I remember moments that I wanted to have milk and there was no milk. Old houses in Brazil have a room named "dispensa". It is used to stock food in crisis. I have the impression I remember watching the stepmother of my mother paying food with gold (GOLD!). I've also been exposed to similar levels of violence as the author had (for example, watched little friends die without medical aids, because they were poorer than me, there was no public medical assistance and nobody would pay for them). My family and my relatives have never abandoned me (when State doesn't protect you, your "tribal" relationships do). I am very grateful for them because of that. As the author and her mother were abandoned by their family and relatives (they don't seem to be poor Brazilians, poor Brazilians don't have appartments and houses), and she was black and poor (what make things much worse), they became the most fragile part of a society where things like, finding food and having medical assistance was a challenge to all social classes. They suffered more. But the nightmares of 80s ended. Brazil is a completely different country since 1994. We have many serious problems, but not those problems Christina describes in her book. Foreigners don't understand that quite well. They still believe we are living in the end of 80s. And this book doesn't contribute to change this idea.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Harry

    What a tragic book! It is not only tragic because a little girl had to grow up living in caves and the Brazilian favela (slum) and being desperate enough to kill for half-eaten food that was thrown in the garbage. It is also tragic that the experience left Christina so emotionally scarred that she couldn't accept love in her new home in Sweden. When it comes to Mamae in Brazil vs. Mama in Sweden, the former wins hands down even though Mamae was mentally ill and could not provide the necessities o What a tragic book! It is not only tragic because a little girl had to grow up living in caves and the Brazilian favela (slum) and being desperate enough to kill for half-eaten food that was thrown in the garbage. It is also tragic that the experience left Christina so emotionally scarred that she couldn't accept love in her new home in Sweden. When it comes to Mamae in Brazil vs. Mama in Sweden, the former wins hands down even though Mamae was mentally ill and could not provide the necessities of life. Till Lili-ann's dying day, Christina could never tell her adoptive mother that she loved her. Her adoptive father, Sture, is barely mentioned. I feel bad for the adoptive parents; they certainly did not get what they bargained for. The author glosses over the fact that she seems ungrateful to be adopted and lead a "normal" life in Sweden. The adoption saved her from a life of extreme destitution, malnourishment, disease, violence, glue sniffing and the strong possibility of death - just like her father, her brother and several of her acquaintances. Unlike millions of other "street rats," Christina was lucky enough to be whisked away to the other side of the globe where none of these problems exist. Yet all she does is moan about the fact that she didn't understand why she and Mamae may never see eachother again. I might accept these feelings in a 7 year old, but when they are still percolating in a 30-something adult, something is wrong. The subtitle, "A Memoir of Finding a Home Across the World," says it all. The book is about Christina's quest of finding her biological family in Brazil. Yet tragically she could never find a home across the world in Sweden. The book is not especially well written (or translated), and it gets rather preachy toward the end. I am amazed by all the 5 star reviews this book received.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Urenna Sander

    Brazilian-Swede, Christina Ricardsson, née Christiana Coelho lives in Umea, Sweden. At eight years-old, she and her twenty-two month old brother, Patrick, who was known as Patrique Jose Coelho, were adopted by a loving Swedish couple, Lili-ann and Sture Ricardsson. Christina remembers she spent most of her time on the streets of Sao Paulo, often without her mother. As a toddler, Patrick’s only memory is sleeping in a box. With a friend, Christina begins searching for her biological mother in Bra Brazilian-Swede, Christina Ricardsson, née Christiana Coelho lives in Umea, Sweden. At eight years-old, she and her twenty-two month old brother, Patrick, who was known as Patrique Jose Coelho, were adopted by a loving Swedish couple, Lili-ann and Sture Ricardsson. Christina remembers she spent most of her time on the streets of Sao Paulo, often without her mother. As a toddler, Patrick’s only memory is sleeping in a box. With a friend, Christina begins searching for her biological mother in Brazil. In the adoption records Christina discovered her mother, Petronilia, is listed as abusive. However, she remembers her mother as a warm and loving caregiver. She does not remember stating “I do not want to live like this.” She worried that her biological mother could have been told this. Christina realized there is a difference between choosing not to take care of your children and living in a society that does not give its citizens resources so they can take care of them. This is a memoir, often sad and disheartening. Young, abandoned children are exploited and murdered. But the beauty and purity of Christina’s love and loyalty for her parent, sibling and friends is vivid and heartfelt. It overpowers the favelas, laden with crime and violence. Yet there are empathetic, warmhearted people too, living in surroundings on the fringes of an unkind, uncaring, and unjust society. I believe Christina and Patrick’s blessing was to experience a better life. Four stars.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Kristy

    Disturbed Can I be the only reader who is deeply disturbed by the fact that the author murdered another child and did not address this further in her book? I see that it was a dire, disturbing, unfathomable life she was living and perhaps she didn’t fully grasp what she had done at the time. However, now 25 years older, she spends endless pages of this book on self reflection, yet her stabbing an 8-year-old to death barely fills a handful of pages and is never mentioned again. I find this lack o Disturbed Can I be the only reader who is deeply disturbed by the fact that the author murdered another child and did not address this further in her book? I see that it was a dire, disturbing, unfathomable life she was living and perhaps she didn’t fully grasp what she had done at the time. However, now 25 years older, she spends endless pages of this book on self reflection, yet her stabbing an 8-year-old to death barely fills a handful of pages and is never mentioned again. I find this lack of reflection incomprehensible and it ruined any feelings I may have had for her or her story.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Amanda

    An incredibly honest memoir and interestingly told going back and forth between Christina as a child in Brazil (where her name was Christiana) and as an adult Christina going back to Brazil from Sweden to try to find her birth family. One can't read this memoir without feeling deeply for the author. I do wish a bit more was written about how she came to integrate her Brazil and Swedish selves after her trip to Brazil. But I can also understand why that wasn't written.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Eileen Prussman

    This true story gives us a real glimpse into two different worlds: that of an impoverished child living in a cave and then on the streets in a Brazilian ghetto, and the other in a well-to-do village in Northern Sweden. I don't think any travel would give us a more accurate idea of what real life is like for such unfortunate children. The author writes her story by alternating the periods in her life. One chapter takes place in her childhood in Brazil, and the next one takes place with her adopte This true story gives us a real glimpse into two different worlds: that of an impoverished child living in a cave and then on the streets in a Brazilian ghetto, and the other in a well-to-do village in Northern Sweden. I don't think any travel would give us a more accurate idea of what real life is like for such unfortunate children. The author writes her story by alternating the periods in her life. One chapter takes place in her childhood in Brazil, and the next one takes place with her adopted family in Sweden. This alternating does not make it difficult to comprehend, in actuality, the alternating helps us really feel the culture shock she went through. I loved this story, but I cried through much of it. Kudos also to the translator, because this book never feels as if it were written in any language other than English. I highly recommend this book to anyone who wants to open their mind to the realities of growing up poor. While the U.S. does have a limited amount of social safety nets, I believe poverty-stricken families in this country are not so far removed from the hardships faced by the impoverished of Brazil.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Greta Samuelson

    How do some humans endure so much pain and danger ? I cannot even begin to imagine children living at the levels of poverty they do in our world. Christina Rickardsson is doing great things- read her story - like her FB page for her foundation; The Coelho Growth Foundation. Go forth and be a better human for our world

  9. 5 out of 5

    Debbie Carlson

    The book is a little scattered because the author is working through her identity issues and guilt as she writes. I was fascinated with her process. She built up suspense leading to her reunion with her mother. I thought the contradictions in her personality were interesting, proving her point that she was split between her Swedish self and her Brazilian self. Yes, she did ask a lot of questions, and I found them annoying after awhile. While my life is unlike the author's, I find that I have mad The book is a little scattered because the author is working through her identity issues and guilt as she writes. I was fascinated with her process. She built up suspense leading to her reunion with her mother. I thought the contradictions in her personality were interesting, proving her point that she was split between her Swedish self and her Brazilian self. Yes, she did ask a lot of questions, and I found them annoying after awhile. While my life is unlike the author's, I find that I have made many of the same realizations about life and about society. I applaud the author for her courage to write so boldly and truthfully.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Andy Roberts

    Amazing book detailing a young girls' life starting from forest caves outside Sao Paulo and then onto the city streets. It describes the horrific moments in a favela where murders , drug taking , robbery , police corruption and children sniffing glue to stave off starvation is common and yet extreme poverty does not prevent love. She escapes by getting adopted and moving to the more luxurious Sweden but her thoughts do not leave the slums back in Brazil. This book is available on Amazon Prime Rea Amazing book detailing a young girls' life starting from forest caves outside Sao Paulo and then onto the city streets. It describes the horrific moments in a favela where murders , drug taking , robbery , police corruption and children sniffing glue to stave off starvation is common and yet extreme poverty does not prevent love. She escapes by getting adopted and moving to the more luxurious Sweden but her thoughts do not leave the slums back in Brazil. This book is available on Amazon Prime Reading at the moment as one of the free books to download. I really recommend it!

  11. 4 out of 5

    Mariamosh

    Snudd på en femma här. Kunde. Inte. Sluta. Läsa. Ett oerhört starkt öde, en oerhört stark berättelse. Läs den.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Sandi Dickenson

    Provoking read This Amazon selection was well worth my time. Outstanding translation. Written in the first person, the author made me feel I was with her in the isolated cave and the crowed inner city streets. This is a straightforward, raw and honest recollection of what she endured in her childhood and how it influenced what she now does as an adult. She's a professional speaker who brings awareness of and solutions to children living in poverty. Not the welfare-food stamps of industrial societ Provoking read This Amazon selection was well worth my time. Outstanding translation. Written in the first person, the author made me feel I was with her in the isolated cave and the crowed inner city streets. This is a straightforward, raw and honest recollection of what she endured in her childhood and how it influenced what she now does as an adult. She's a professional speaker who brings awareness of and solutions to children living in poverty. Not the welfare-food stamps of industrial societies, but of those countries with no safety nets. Where children fend for themselves until they are old enough to be used for another purpose- menial labor or worse. Her hope is to bring them an opportunity to become loving adults. She learns at a young age that good people do bad things to survive and that being forced into survival mode is justification for wrongdoing. I can't help compare that to the TV show Survior where it is OK for people to lie, steal and deceive in order to be the only Survivor (an awarded title). We recognize that when the TV show ends, the person does not live life that way in the real world because underneath it all they are "good". It is only the experience of surviving that leads to justified wrongdoing. Christiana makes us think of the why. Why, when bad people do those same bad things is it judged differently? When the only purpose of a crime is to inflict pain and suffering? Before this, I was reading a Holocaust survivor book. It also portrayed situations where good people doing bad things were justified while those doing bad things for the sake of cruelty where not justified. Can a society intervention help? Should we intervene? When? Do we have an obligation to help children even when it means prying them away from the arms of their beloved parent? At least one critic points out that Brazil of the 1980's no longer exists. That social programs are now the norm. I think though, the greater issue is that this scenerio will always exist somewhere. We have pockets of children living in this type of poverty somewhere. Does it really matter how prolonged and how extreme the poverty is? Don't we adults have an obligation to help these children?

  13. 5 out of 5

    Meg Leader

    I got this book through Amazon Prime First, or whatever the program is called. I'll admit, it was the best option for me of the six that were offered, but wasn't something I would have gone looking for. That said, I found myself curious enough about the book to pick it right up to read and I found it fascinating. Christina does a wonderful job building a picture of her life in Brazil and giving enough of her current life details to get an understanding of her motivations. My only criticism is th I got this book through Amazon Prime First, or whatever the program is called. I'll admit, it was the best option for me of the six that were offered, but wasn't something I would have gone looking for. That said, I found myself curious enough about the book to pick it right up to read and I found it fascinating. Christina does a wonderful job building a picture of her life in Brazil and giving enough of her current life details to get an understanding of her motivations. My only criticism is the number of unanswered questions I finished the book with.

  14. 5 out of 5

    jose coimbra

    Cristina nos narra em suas memórias a experiência de sua vida no Brasil até os oito anos de idade, quando então teria sido adotada por casal sueco, migrando para a Europa na companhia também de seu irmão, que estava com dois anos à época. O livro gira em torno da busca da autora, aos 32 anos, pelo paradeiro de sua mãe natural e de informações sobre sua família de origem. Trata-se igualmente da busca por algo que Critina acredita estar perdido no passado, no Brasil, quase esquecido da mesma forma Cristina nos narra em suas memórias a experiência de sua vida no Brasil até os oito anos de idade, quando então teria sido adotada por casal sueco, migrando para a Europa na companhia também de seu irmão, que estava com dois anos à época. O livro gira em torno da busca da autora, aos 32 anos, pelo paradeiro de sua mãe natural e de informações sobre sua família de origem. Trata-se igualmente da busca por algo que Critina acredita estar perdido no passado, no Brasil, quase esquecido da mesma forma como a língua portuguesa para ela. No percurso para o qual Cristina nos conduz, intercalam-se diferentes momentos de sua vida. Os capítulos nos mostram sua infância, vivendo em uma caverna e sobrevivendo a muito custo nas cercanias de Diamantina, a vida nas ruas de São Paulo, a violência, as mortes, o amor e a educação para a vida que sua mãe lhe transmitiria diariamente. Eles revelam também sua vida na Suécia, a nova família, a descoberta de uma nova língua e mundo, as dificuldades. A busca, no Brasil, também é narrada, explicitando a divisão que marca a constituição de Cristina e sua relação com o passado que se faz presente, lembrando-a de que ela também é Cristiana, seu nome quando residia no Brasil. As perdas e o luto são temas importantes no livro, sendo a mãe natural, a mãe adotiva e uma amiga, assassinada por policiais quando criança, três referências importantes em torno das quais o livro se delineia. Cristina escreve como que costurando as perdas marcantes de sua vida, criticando nesse ato a desigualdade brasileira e a insuficiente atenção e cuidado concedidos à parcela significativa da população brasileira, em particular crianças pobres e negras, jogando sobre todos um manto de invisibilidade. Ela igualmente compartilha conosco os enigmas que orientam sua vida e sua busca: Por que foi adotada? Qual o motivo da separação de sua mãe? O que teria acontecido a ela? O que de Cristiana permanece em Cristina? O que as poucas lembranças e os sonhos que a acompanham significam? Cristina alinha-se a algumas outras narrativas que também tiveram por base interrogações semelhantes, tais como as de Kiko Goifman ou de Sophie Bredier, para testemunhar acerca das respostas que pôde oferecer às questões que a guiavam. Trata-se de lançar uma perspectiva sobre como se tornou o que é, lidando com as lacunas que permanecem, e apostando na possibilidade de inventar-se a si mesma, como nos deixa ver com suas palavras. . . . A loteria da vida: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pVMzU... Leia também: CARDOSO, Roselane Martins. A infância e a adolescência abandonadas: laudos em processos do judiciário mineiro (1968-1984). Memorandum, Belo Horizonte, p. 71-84. 01 out. 2006. Disponível em: http://bit.ly/1eUUKmn. Acesso em: 16 set. 2017.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Stephanie

    37 highlights in this book. That must be a record for me. Got this one through Kindle First, mostly because the thrillers sounded lame. I’m so glad I did, it is a gem among the rough. This memoir is heartbreaking. What Christina/Christiana went through is a life no child or adult should ever endure and yet they continue to today. But her optimism and strength shines through, while being critical to the authority figures in her life at that time. She is so honest seeming throughout. It’s humble a 37 highlights in this book. That must be a record for me. Got this one through Kindle First, mostly because the thrillers sounded lame. I’m so glad I did, it is a gem among the rough. This memoir is heartbreaking. What Christina/Christiana went through is a life no child or adult should ever endure and yet they continue to today. But her optimism and strength shines through, while being critical to the authority figures in her life at that time. She is so honest seeming throughout. It’s humble and sincere. I would recommend this book to pretty much anyone :) beware of crying.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Tifani

    This is a very interesting book that made me revisit my opinions of poverty. Her story of her upbringing in Brazil as compared to her adoption to Sweden is heartbreaking and sweet, and definitely highlights deficiencies in a broken system. I am glad I read it, and I recommend. However, the book does have deficiencies. The quality of writing is not great. While the story is good, there are inconsistencies, facts that are omitted from the story, which are brought out later, and some confusing time This is a very interesting book that made me revisit my opinions of poverty. Her story of her upbringing in Brazil as compared to her adoption to Sweden is heartbreaking and sweet, and definitely highlights deficiencies in a broken system. I am glad I read it, and I recommend. However, the book does have deficiencies. The quality of writing is not great. While the story is good, there are inconsistencies, facts that are omitted from the story, which are brought out later, and some confusing timelines. These may be the result of the translation to English, I am not sure. There is also a lot of repetition and the sentence "I had so many emotions flowing through me" is repeated so many times it loses meaning. A bit of editing could have helped. The story focuses on her relationship with her Brazilian birth mother and her adoptive Swedish mother, and highlights her broken ability to love. However, she barely mentions her adoptive father, who I don't know anything about after reading this book, and doesn't give any perspective of her brother, who was adopted with her from Brazil to Sweden. These would have been interesting, and seems an odd omission. The end gets a little preachy, and tries to tell the reader the lesson they should be learning from this book. I do recommend reading, but be sure to forgive some of blunders and instead focus on what can be learned.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Cynthia

    A truly amazing story, but unfortunately I don’t think the author pulled me into it the way she could have. I couldn’t generate the amount of empathy she deserves. Maybe it was lost in translation.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Heather

    This is a heartbreaking story of a child living in extreme poverty on the streets in Brazil.  The things that happen to her are horrific including witnessing the murder of her best friend by the police, seeing numerous rapes, and killing another child in a fight over food.  Because this all happened as a child she didn't clearly know or remember the reasons why they lived like they did.  All she knew was that her mother loved her and her little brother but that there were also times when she wa This is a heartbreaking story of a child living in extreme poverty on the streets in Brazil.  The things that happen to her are horrific including witnessing the murder of her best friend by the police, seeing numerous rapes, and killing another child in a fight over food.  Because this all happened as a child she didn't clearly know or remember the reasons why they lived like they did.  All she knew was that her mother loved her and her little brother but that there were also times when she wasn't around.  The children were taken to an orphanage where they were eventually not allowed to have contact with their mother and then were adopted by a couple from Sweden. Nothing that was going on was explained to her. As an adult she decides to go back to Brazil to try to find her mother and to find out what really happened to make sense of her childhood memories.  She examines the disconnect she feels about being grateful for her good life in Sweden that wouldn't have happened if she wasn't forcibly taken from her mother but also being angry about being separated from the person who loved her.  The book is very simply written or translated.  That makes it a very stark read.  It is very sad but I think it is necessary to know what is going on in the poorest parts of society.  Once again in reading this book I was struck by how often male sexual violence towards women and children is considered to be an everyday thing.  I hate knowing that there are women who have to submit to being raped because they are told that it is her or her child.  Books like this just make me want to have a moratorium on men for a while.This review was originally posted on Based On A True Story

  19. 5 out of 5

    Hillary

    This was a Kindle first book and in some ways, it's quite remarkable. The story about a young girl from the Brazilian favela who is adopted by a Swedish family is unusual (at least for me, an American reader). Kindle first books are often hit-or-miss, and this is no exception. What I liked: Through this story, I got to see and experience the favela and the caves as well as life in modern-day Sweden. I particularly enjoyed how the author describes her experiences as a child would see and understan This was a Kindle first book and in some ways, it's quite remarkable. The story about a young girl from the Brazilian favela who is adopted by a Swedish family is unusual (at least for me, an American reader). Kindle first books are often hit-or-miss, and this is no exception. What I liked: Through this story, I got to see and experience the favela and the caves as well as life in modern-day Sweden. I particularly enjoyed how the author describes her experiences as a child would see and understand them. Certain aspects an adult would care about (like hygiene) are not even noticed, since a child wouldn't care about them. Others, like games and candy and fights, are described in great detail. There's a lot little Christiana does not understand, and a lot no child should experience. I also give credit to the translator. I know nothing about Swedish, but the language in this book came across as perfectly colloquial American English. There were no glitches or stops; I had no need to work hard to follow what was being said. What I didn't like: There is a lot of repetition, and a lot of "I had so many emotions flowing through me"-type sentences. This book could do with a good bit of editing, something I've noticed in other Kindle first books. Still, I learned a lot and found parts of it very interesting. I hope Rickardsson will be able to follow her dream and find ways to help children like her.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Hanna Bylund

    Vilken underbar bok. Jag fick den av min gamla lärare som sa att jag bara måste läsa den så han köpte den till mig. Det är jag väldigt tacksam för. Hela boken blev en resa, en resa som berörde mycket. Jag kom på mig med att tänka på den när jag var ute och joggade, stod i duschen och satt på tåget Jag stannade upp emellanåt för att reflektera. Jag blev påmind om hur många barn som lever på det här viset i slummen, som måste slåss för resterna i soptunnorna och som riskerar nackskott av polisen. Vilken underbar bok. Jag fick den av min gamla lärare som sa att jag bara måste läsa den så han köpte den till mig. Det är jag väldigt tacksam för. Hela boken blev en resa, en resa som berörde mycket. Jag kom på mig med att tänka på den när jag var ute och joggade, stod i duschen och satt på tåget Jag stannade upp emellanåt för att reflektera. Jag blev påmind om hur många barn som lever på det här viset i slummen, som måste slåss för resterna i soptunnorna och som riskerar nackskott av polisen. Ofattbart för oss som bor i I-länder. Intressant att läsa tankarna från någon som levt i båda extrema världarna . Jag har själv gått genom mycket men blev återigen påmind om att jag har det väldigt bra.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Jacqueline

    Your pages will keep turning as the author keeps walking... I was completely taken in by this book page by page wanting to know what happened next and yet inside I was thinking how I wish I could make the story become less horrifying for the author to have endured. However there were many times when my heart soared and I felt one with the author and knew her words affected me to the core. I will leave you with a quote that was so profound to me: Love can’t be bought , or elicited on request. It is Your pages will keep turning as the author keeps walking... I was completely taken in by this book page by page wanting to know what happened next and yet inside I was thinking how I wish I could make the story become less horrifying for the author to have endured. However there were many times when my heart soared and I felt one with the author and knew her words affected me to the core. I will leave you with a quote that was so profound to me: Love can’t be bought , or elicited on request. It is a gift that we chose to give and to receive. It’s unselfish and maybe it can’t move mountains, but it can do something even better: it can save a life. I believe truly this book is worth reading and as it was and is an inspiration to me and for many a validation that humanity in all of us raw, sensitive, sometimes harsh but always full of love.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Mobeme53 Branson

    As a child Christiana/Christine lived in the jungle and on the streets of Brazil. The life she lived there is horrific and shocking. The level of violence she endured is unimaginable to me. At 8, she is adopted to a loving family in Sweden. Although this turns out to be a good thing, the way she and her brother are taken away from her mother is disturbing and heartbreaking. The second half of the book is devoted to her trip back to Brazil and her reuniting with her mother. Even this chapter of h As a child Christiana/Christine lived in the jungle and on the streets of Brazil. The life she lived there is horrific and shocking. The level of violence she endured is unimaginable to me. At 8, she is adopted to a loving family in Sweden. Although this turns out to be a good thing, the way she and her brother are taken away from her mother is disturbing and heartbreaking. The second half of the book is devoted to her trip back to Brazil and her reuniting with her mother. Even this chapter of her life is filled with sadness albeit mixed with joy. I would have liked a little more insight into her relationship with her adoptive father and brother; however, that is nitpicking. This should be required reading for young adults to get a perspective on life outside of this country and would make a terrific selection for a book club.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Kellie

    A life story worth reading I am at a loss as to how to describe how fascinating, valuable and incredible this memoir is. As an adoptive parent, who adopted older children, this was invaluable to help me consider their perspective. As a person concerned with at risk children, it was enlightening. As a human who has navigated complex relationships, loss and issues of belonging, it was so relatable. She has a way of describing life that instantly feels familiar even if her experiences where vastly d A life story worth reading I am at a loss as to how to describe how fascinating, valuable and incredible this memoir is. As an adoptive parent, who adopted older children, this was invaluable to help me consider their perspective. As a person concerned with at risk children, it was enlightening. As a human who has navigated complex relationships, loss and issues of belonging, it was so relatable. She has a way of describing life that instantly feels familiar even if her experiences where vastly different from my own.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Kristi Duarte

    This is such a fascinating story and should be a must-read, especially for people who have never traveled to poor countries (or poor areas of their own countries.) It's amazing what a person can live through and come out alive and actually sane on the other side. I'm in awe of how Christiana/Christina managed to embrace her both cultures and families, especially since they are so wildly different. I would be curious to learn what happens once she has her own children.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Patty S.

    A memoir of a street kid from Brazil adopted by a Swedish family This was not always easy to read, but well worth the effort. It tells of how a Swedish young woman tries to unite her Brazilian childhood of poverty with her adopted life as s Swedish adult. It is a work of trying to self-determine who she is. There is a lot that she does not include in this work, left out for reasons of privacy I imagine. But also because the writer is still trying to find herself.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Tuvia Pollack

    Amazing and thought-provoking story about a girl who grew up as a street child in Sao Paolo, Brazil, and at age 8 was adopted to a Swedish family. Now she is telling her story and working on making a difference in the world.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Jenn

    This book was absolutely fascinating to me. I had to keep reminding myself that the author is only a few years younger than me, because it seemed so unbelievable that at the same time I was living a comfortable life in the US, she was scrounging for scraps of food in Brazil. Very eye-opening. I did feel like the ending went too fast...I craved more stories and details from her trip to Brazil to find her family and would loved for her to go even more in-depth on that part.

  28. 4 out of 5

    LKay

    Interesting I understood what the author was trying to convey by sharing her story. I did get that and that was her goal. And that is wonderful. But the story felt like it stuttered along. Trying to give enough detail to her story to paint the picture but not so much as to lose the reader. Not a smooth read. It was interesting but I had to kind of make myself pick it up again to finish. All in all God bless this young lady. I can't imagine growing up in her circumstances. She is a wonderful examp Interesting I understood what the author was trying to convey by sharing her story. I did get that and that was her goal. And that is wonderful. But the story felt like it stuttered along. Trying to give enough detail to her story to paint the picture but not so much as to lose the reader. Not a smooth read. It was interesting but I had to kind of make myself pick it up again to finish. All in all God bless this young lady. I can't imagine growing up in her circumstances. She is a wonderful example of how to not let your past define your future.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Abby

    As an adoptive parent of kids who knew and could remembertheir families, the author’s account of that transition echoed some of what my kids went though, and maybe more than I realized. Her account of her life in the favelas was gripping, as well as shocking. Her account of her earlier years, of everything she learned from her birth mother about faith, science, humor, and survival, makes clear her mother was smart, and loved, cared for, and taught her well. Although much of the narrative is focu As an adoptive parent of kids who knew and could remembertheir families, the author’s account of that transition echoed some of what my kids went though, and maybe more than I realized. Her account of her life in the favelas was gripping, as well as shocking. Her account of her earlier years, of everything she learned from her birth mother about faith, science, humor, and survival, makes clear her mother was smart, and loved, cared for, and taught her well. Although much of the narrative is focused on others, the self-portrait is insightful and powerful. A reader does not need to be part of any adoption triangle to appreciate this book.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Darhla Stanley

    Inspiring story I really enjoyed reading this story of accomplishment and survival. It is well written and very cohesive. She has contributed greatly to our world.

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.