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The Leaving Year

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A coming-of-age YA novel about the daughter of a Pacific Northwest fisherman, whose presumed drowning in 1967 has her searching for answers, including whether or not he’s really dead. As the Summer of Love comes to an end, 15-year-old Ida Petrovich waits for a father who never comes home. While commercial fishing in Alaska, he is lost at sea, but with no body and no wrecka A coming-of-age YA novel about the daughter of a Pacific Northwest fisherman, whose presumed drowning in 1967 has her searching for answers, including whether or not he’s really dead. As the Summer of Love comes to an end, 15-year-old Ida Petrovich waits for a father who never comes home. While commercial fishing in Alaska, he is lost at sea, but with no body and no wreckage, Ida and her mother are forced to accept a “presumed” death that tests their already strained relationship. While still in shock over the loss of her father, Ida overhears an adult conversation that shatters everything she thought she knew about him. This prompts her to set out on a search for the truth that takes her from her Washington State hometown to Southeast Alaska, where she works at a salmon cannery, develops love for a Filipino classmate, and befriends a Native Alaskan girl. In this wild, rugged place, she also begins to understand the physical and emotional bonds that took her father north and why he kept them secret—a journey of discovery that ultimately brings her family together and helps them heal. Insightful and heartfelt, The Leaving Year is a tale of love and loyalty, family and friendship, and the stories we tell ourselves in our search for meaning.


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A coming-of-age YA novel about the daughter of a Pacific Northwest fisherman, whose presumed drowning in 1967 has her searching for answers, including whether or not he’s really dead. As the Summer of Love comes to an end, 15-year-old Ida Petrovich waits for a father who never comes home. While commercial fishing in Alaska, he is lost at sea, but with no body and no wrecka A coming-of-age YA novel about the daughter of a Pacific Northwest fisherman, whose presumed drowning in 1967 has her searching for answers, including whether or not he’s really dead. As the Summer of Love comes to an end, 15-year-old Ida Petrovich waits for a father who never comes home. While commercial fishing in Alaska, he is lost at sea, but with no body and no wreckage, Ida and her mother are forced to accept a “presumed” death that tests their already strained relationship. While still in shock over the loss of her father, Ida overhears an adult conversation that shatters everything she thought she knew about him. This prompts her to set out on a search for the truth that takes her from her Washington State hometown to Southeast Alaska, where she works at a salmon cannery, develops love for a Filipino classmate, and befriends a Native Alaskan girl. In this wild, rugged place, she also begins to understand the physical and emotional bonds that took her father north and why he kept them secret—a journey of discovery that ultimately brings her family together and helps them heal. Insightful and heartfelt, The Leaving Year is a tale of love and loyalty, family and friendship, and the stories we tell ourselves in our search for meaning.

30 review for The Leaving Year

  1. 5 out of 5

    Kassidy

    Such a moving story!

  2. 5 out of 5

    Lara (Bookish_turtle)

    The Leaving Year was very beautifully written, with a really interesting combination of ideas. However, it was quite slow moving and there was not a whole lot that happened during the first part of the novel particularly. The second half I loved though! It's not an overly long book, but I feel that it could have been just a bit shorter. One main thing I think made this book a bit harder to read was that it felt detached. I didn't really feel the main character, and for the first half of the book The Leaving Year was very beautifully written, with a really interesting combination of ideas. However, it was quite slow moving and there was not a whole lot that happened during the first part of the novel particularly. The second half I loved though! It's not an overly long book, but I feel that it could have been just a bit shorter. One main thing I think made this book a bit harder to read was that it felt detached. I didn't really feel the main character, and for the first half of the book I couldn't remember her name. I also found that the setting wasn't really established in the first part of the novel. It is set around 1970, but it took me a little while to realise this, as it isn't really referred to at the beginning of the novel. But it was a really nice narrative, and I loved all of the side characters that made appearances throughout the novel. It was a really great concept to go along with this pretty cover and title. But the second half of the book picked up considerably, and I think that after I was in part 2, I began to really enjoy the novel. I also really loved the definitions included at the beginning of each chapter. They were my favourite part! Many thanks to Netgalley and the publishers for providing me with a review copy! All opinions are my own.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Kayla

    I got sent this book in exchange for a honest review, all my opinions are my own and thank you so much to the publishers for sending me this book! So not to give too much away but in this book we follow a girl who is trying to find out more about herself and her family at the time of the civil rights movement. Ida's father is presumed lost at sea but when she hears a conversation said by her mother, her journey will take another turn. I really liked this story, I found such a fascinating and unique I got sent this book in exchange for a honest review, all my opinions are my own and thank you so much to the publishers for sending me this book! So not to give too much away but in this book we follow a girl who is trying to find out more about herself and her family at the time of the civil rights movement. Ida's father is presumed lost at sea but when she hears a conversation said by her mother, her journey will take another turn. I really liked this story, I found such a fascinating and unique concept. I wasn't too fond of the characters in this novel but it's a stand alone and I don't usually love characters in stand alone because I don't get to know them well enough. Almost every aspect of this book was really really good. I liked how this wasn't set in our time and in 'The Summer of love" 1967. If this premise sounds interesting to you then I would highly reccomend it, it is published on the 14th August 2018.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Erin

    “It never mattered to me what he did when he was away, so long as he came back. Now that he’s gone, I want to find out all I can.” The sea is a mean wife, anyone who’s ever read, watched, or studied the ocean knows this. And yet it still calls to people, like doctors are called to medicine, like moths to a flame. Ida’s father has gone missing, it is presumed that his boat had some catastrophic event and he drowned, only without witnesses or evidence, it’s impossible to know for sure. But what she “It never mattered to me what he did when he was away, so long as he came back. Now that he’s gone, I want to find out all I can.” The sea is a mean wife, anyone who’s ever read, watched, or studied the ocean knows this. And yet it still calls to people, like doctors are called to medicine, like moths to a flame. Ida’s father has gone missing, it is presumed that his boat had some catastrophic event and he drowned, only without witnesses or evidence, it’s impossible to know for sure. But what she does know, is that her parents have kept secrets from her, and her mother, so weighed down with grief, either refuses or is unable to shed any light, prompting Ida to leave and get the answers she so desperately desires for herself. Set in a time when the Civil rights movement was at its peak, this is an important story about acceptance, love, and not allowing fear to govern you. Overall, I liked The Leaving Year, there were some interesting characters and events. I especially enjoyed the richness of culture and diversity. But given that this book was so emotionally driven in its content, I found it to be a little detached in parts, I didn’t feel the emotions come through the text, and so I felt a bit disengaged with the story. Though in saying this, it may have just been me and my frame of mind on the day that I read this book, as it is quite a beautiful story, one that I will definitely read again in the future. Thank you to Pam McGaffin, SparkPress, and NetGalley, for a copy of this book in exchange for honest review.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Meghan

    I received this book as an advanced reader's copy and from the moment I read the first page, this book intrigued me. I fell in love with Ida and the struggles and adventures that awaited her. A bond between a father and a daughter is the strongest bond in the world and when something jeopardizes that, you can't help but to go after the problem and fix it. This book has some good life lessons that everyone should know at some point in their lives. Our reader's love inspirational novels such as th I received this book as an advanced reader's copy and from the moment I read the first page, this book intrigued me. I fell in love with Ida and the struggles and adventures that awaited her. A bond between a father and a daughter is the strongest bond in the world and when something jeopardizes that, you can't help but to go after the problem and fix it. This book has some good life lessons that everyone should know at some point in their lives. Our reader's love inspirational novels such as this, even though it is fictional and can learn a lot from the plot. A wonderful read that we will be so excited to add to our collection. 5 stars!

  6. 5 out of 5

    April

    A wonderful and emotional coming of age story that will warm your heart, I loved this book so much I couldn't put to down it was so addictive Ida’s search for a missing father. I would highly recommend giving it a read.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Vi

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. I’ll try to keep this as spoiler free as possible so everyone could read it. Thank you to SparkPress, Pam McGaffin and JeanBookNerd for giving me the eARC in exchange for an honest review. The book will start off in the late 1960s, early 1970s in the point of view of fifteen-year-old Ida as she realizes that her father would not be coming back to her as he was now lost in sea, now presumed dead. With some speculation that he might not be, Ida decides to find and unravel all information she could I’ll try to keep this as spoiler free as possible so everyone could read it. Thank you to SparkPress, Pam McGaffin and JeanBookNerd for giving me the eARC in exchange for an honest review. The book will start off in the late 1960s, early 1970s in the point of view of fifteen-year-old Ida as she realizes that her father would not be coming back to her as he was now lost in sea, now presumed dead. With some speculation that he might not be, Ida decides to find and unravel all information she could find of her father–disobeying her mother’s wishes. It’s a story of love, family, and culture at the peak of the Civil Rights Movement. “If you’re dead, I’m sorry. If you’re alive and don’t care what happens to me, then I don’t care either.” To start off, Ida was a character that I didn’t relate with at first but I did grow to root for as the book progresses. I love her point of view–that slow realization that her father was missing and there was a chance that he wasn’t coming back. You get to see how she deals with that grief as she goes in search for different clues especially with the frail (I’m not sure how to describe it) relationship her and her mother has. Her mother was a character that I honestly wanted to have more development throughout the book, maybe even see just more into Ida and her mother’s relationship I guess? Because it just felt dry and forced half the book. Though I do love the other characters–Sam, Jody, and even her cousin Dena. I love their interactions, my favorite being her and her cousin’s friendship (honestly would’ve wanted more scenes with the two) though it wasn’t as frequent as the others’. I do love the innocent love Sam and Ida had. “Fear remains the greatest enemy of peace because it prevents people from getting to know each other for who they really are. When we’re afraid, we don’t react out, we don’t question, we don’t try to understand. We don’t make friends. It takes courage to really get to know people who we think of as different, but we must. Otherwise, the misunderstandings and lies will become our truth, and we’ll forever be divided.” This is the main essence of the book–fear. Everyone has something they fear. Ida feared that her father was alive somewhere else. Her mother feared of the future of their family. Jody feared to become like her parents. And this is where the story revolves in–where everyone, whether they play a very small part in the book or a very large part, try and get over the fear that they all hold so deeply within them–which makes the plot unravel even further throughout the book. If you’re looking for a light read of self-discovery and family, this coming-of-age book is definitely one to look at. If you want to follow this blog tour, go Here! xxxmylittlebookishthoughsxxs

  8. 5 out of 5

    Annie-JoElizabeth

    "When you suddenly lose someone you love, all that love doesn't know where to go so it drifts around homeless. It may even change shape, turning to fear, anger before settling into that hole that never goes away." - Pam McGaffin, The Leaving Year In 1967, Ida's life changes unexpectedly and forever when her dad's fishing boat is lost on his way home from Alaska. But how does she - how does anyone - know he's really dead? The answers - and the other part of her dad's life - have to be in Alaska. A "When you suddenly lose someone you love, all that love doesn't know where to go so it drifts around homeless. It may even change shape, turning to fear, anger before settling into that hole that never goes away." - Pam McGaffin, The Leaving Year In 1967, Ida's life changes unexpectedly and forever when her dad's fishing boat is lost on his way home from Alaska. But how does she - how does anyone - know he's really dead? The answers - and the other part of her dad's life - have to be in Alaska. And how will Ida know for sure if she doesn't go and find out? The Leaving Year started out reminding me of two of my favourite YA novels, a good sign, indeed. The setting, both of the sixties (including historical events) and a small fishing town, are woven in subtly enough to create a lovely background for the story. Ida's voice was realistic and reflective of the way she didn't know how to process the situation of her father's disappearance. I thought both Ida and her mother's grief was well portrayed, particularly in the context of their already complicated relationship. Her mum was a fleshed out character, someone you could feel sad for and cheer on for trying to help Ida while dealing with her own grief. My other favourite characters were Sam (the boy Ida likes), Dena (her larger-than-life, fashionable cousin), and Jodie (her Alaskan friend). I liked that they each had a unique relationship dynamic with Ida. The romance was adorable, a classic friends-to-more-than-friends that wasn't rushed. But I did feel like the pacing was a bit off because the first half of the novel was quite slow, yet the second half and the ending was kind of rushed. I was also left feeling like some of the smaller plot threads weren't tied up. All in all, The Leaving Year is a bittersweet coming-of-age story, emphasizing the importance and complexity of family and friendships. I also loved how Indigenous Alaskan culture and discussions of grief, friendships and acceptance are woven into the story. I received an advance copy of this novel from the publisher via Netgalley in exchange for my honest review. All opinions expressed are entirely my own.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Shivangi

    A big thank you to NetGalley and the publishers for sending me an ARC of this book in exchange for an honest review. The Leaving Year is a beautifully written, emotional coming of age story of a girl whose father, a fisherman, is presumed drowned during a fishing trip. It's a story about coming to terms with the fact that her father might never return home, learning things about him that she never knew before and how to deal with them. I am usually not a fan of slow-paced stories and this book s A big thank you to NetGalley and the publishers for sending me an ARC of this book in exchange for an honest review. The Leaving Year is a beautifully written, emotional coming of age story of a girl whose father, a fisherman, is presumed drowned during a fishing trip. It's a story about coming to terms with the fact that her father might never return home, learning things about him that she never knew before and how to deal with them. I am usually not a fan of slow-paced stories and this book starts off quite slow, but I found myself hooked to it nonetheless. Everything that was happening around and to Ida when her father went missing was what immediately drew me in, then it became about how she deals with it and how will she answer the questions she has about her dad. The story also uncovered a part of the world that is unknown to me. It was nice to read about the fishermen villages, the Alaskan canneries and just how things were around there in those days, some fifty years ago. I really enjoyed reading this!

  10. 5 out of 5

    Smh

    Sometimes when I finish a novel I feel a sense of loss. Not because the story made me sad or depressed but more because I've turned the last page and the story is over! That is exactly how I felt after The Leaving Year. From the first few pages I was drawn in and wanted to keep reading. The story was engaging and the characters true to life and compelling. Ida's relationship with her mom and her teen psyche reminded me a little bit of myself at that age and wouldn't I have LOVED going on a summer Sometimes when I finish a novel I feel a sense of loss. Not because the story made me sad or depressed but more because I've turned the last page and the story is over! That is exactly how I felt after The Leaving Year. From the first few pages I was drawn in and wanted to keep reading. The story was engaging and the characters true to life and compelling. Ida's relationship with her mom and her teen psyche reminded me a little bit of myself at that age and wouldn't I have LOVED going on a summer adventure like she did! The racial issues of the day with both the Filipino workers and the Alaska Natives made it all the more believable. I enjoyed the "definitions" at the start of each chapter - a nice touch. It was a very satisfying book to read.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Kathryn Berla

    3.75 Picked this up after it got a starred review in School Library Journal. I loved the book but graded it down for all the telling that happens in the last 20%. My favorite part--the nautical terms that are explained at the beginning of each chapter and which have been adopted into common parlance. For instance: "by and large: By is into the wind, while large is with the wind; used to indicate all possible situations." Who knew? I never did so it was fascinating for me. I also liked reading ab 3.75 Picked this up after it got a starred review in School Library Journal. I loved the book but graded it down for all the telling that happens in the last 20%. My favorite part--the nautical terms that are explained at the beginning of each chapter and which have been adopted into common parlance. For instance: "by and large: By is into the wind, while large is with the wind; used to indicate all possible situations." Who knew? I never did so it was fascinating for me. I also liked reading about the Croatian fishing community and the fact that the main character has my grandmother's maiden name :) A very likeable book that could also be appropriate for younger YA readers.

  12. 5 out of 5

    David Owen Hastings

    Pam McGaffin's debut novel is the story of Ida Petrovich, a young woman growing into her own skin. But it's also so much more, and has great depth. McGaffin deftly weaves questions about race and social mores into a tale with a mystery running throughout: what really happened to Ida's father, who disappeared while fishing in Alaska? I found it very hard to put down, but I also wanted it to last. McGaffin's characters are real and varied — people who are distinctly individualistic. It was a joy t Pam McGaffin's debut novel is the story of Ida Petrovich, a young woman growing into her own skin. But it's also so much more, and has great depth. McGaffin deftly weaves questions about race and social mores into a tale with a mystery running throughout: what really happened to Ida's father, who disappeared while fishing in Alaska? I found it very hard to put down, but I also wanted it to last. McGaffin's characters are real and varied — people who are distinctly individualistic. It was a joy to read, and I'll read it again!

  13. 5 out of 5

    Leeanne Chandler

    I initially bought this book because it was written by a fellow high school classmate. The story line is very engaging. I particularly like the use of nautical terms defined at the beginning of each chapter and loosely interpreted within the chapter. The story is set in the Pacific Northwest and Alaska in the 60's, which brings back fond memories of the part of the country that I love. Well done Pam. Here's to publishing at least two more books before our next high school reunion.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Raz

    Complete review available: The Leaving Year A really strong and moving story set in a place and culture not typically over-explored. The Leaving Year brought something different to the typical tale of self-discovery with some beautifully-written prose to top it all off. I was a little uncertain on Ida (for a 16-year-old there were a couple of moments she felt more like 13 or 14), and times when the pacing felt a little off-kilter (but overall actually turned out OK), though as a whole the book wa Complete review available: The Leaving Year A really strong and moving story set in a place and culture not typically over-explored. The Leaving Year brought something different to the typical tale of self-discovery with some beautifully-written prose to top it all off. I was a little uncertain on Ida (for a 16-year-old there were a couple of moments she felt more like 13 or 14), and times when the pacing felt a little off-kilter (but overall actually turned out OK), though as a whole the book was a quaint, heart-warming read (with some great background knowledge on fishing and canning in 1960s Alaska.) N.B.: An e-ARC of this book was received from NetGalley in return for a complete, honest review.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Haley Lossing

    I received a free copy of this book and voluntarily chose to review. This is an incredible story that you won't be able to put down. You'll need some tissues but it's definitely worth it. This story is fascinating and addictive from page one. A must have for any occasion. A very well formed book that keeps you guessing until the end. I'm completely in love with the characters as well. I look forward to reading more from this author. I more than recommend this book for anyone teen/YA and up.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Cristie Underwood

    Ida is on a journey to find her father in this novel, but the journey switches to one of finding herself. The author did a great job of capturing the pain and hope Ida feels in her journey. I love books that make me feel for the characters so intently and this one did that! I highly recommend this!

  17. 5 out of 5

    Pam

    3.5 stars. My third book this year about Alaska. But unfortunately the story didn’t move there until more than half way. I like a good YA read occasionally and was excited about the premise of this book. But as noted it took a while before the book really took off. Also, while I loved the main character/narrator, she came across more as 13/14 yo than 15/16. While I was hoping for more from this story, I still enjoyed it.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Jan Schleh

    When Ida's father doesn't return from a fishing trip, Ida's life changes forever. Beautifully written, set in the Pacific Northwest and Alaska, McGaffin takes the reader on a powerful coming of age journey, where teens fall in love, follow their heart, and find their truth. A great read from a debut author.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Felicia Allen

    Wow! Ida's father disappears on a fishing boat and presumed dead. She realizes that she doesn't really know all that much about him. Through a series of events, she ends up runnnig away to Alaska. While she is there, she discovers much more than stories about her father.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Peggy Thomson

    This book took awhile to engage me. I am really glad I stayed with it because the story as it unfolds is pretty satisfying. Checked a lot of boxes: Set in Pacific NW Character is my contemporary Different cultures, points of view Looking beyond first impressions of characters

  21. 4 out of 5

    Briana Alzola

    I quite enjoyed this. We read it for our book club and had McGaffin in to talk about the book. It's always fun to read a book set in your home town and to see the things around you from a new perspective.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Smart

    What a charming whole hearted read! I didn't know what to expect with this one but do glad I decided to read it! Thank you netgalley for the free arc in exchange for an honest review!

  23. 4 out of 5

    Joseph

    A compelling story, well crafted, and definitely worth reading. She masterfully created a suspenseful plot line about an adolescent that had me wanting to keep reading it to the very end.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Kristin Lenz

    Official blurb: An atmospheric and richly layered coming-of-age novel with a protagonist to root for and a page-turning mystery. Family secrets, first love, a quest for truth and a character who heals and expands her worldview through a journey to Alaska; what more can you ask for? I loved this thoughtful and uplifting story. Personal note: This was a surprise ARC for me as I have never met the author, Pam, but I was intrigued by the book's summary. I was soon immersed in the story, thoroughly enj Official blurb: An atmospheric and richly layered coming-of-age novel with a protagonist to root for and a page-turning mystery. Family secrets, first love, a quest for truth and a character who heals and expands her worldview through a journey to Alaska; what more can you ask for? I loved this thoughtful and uplifting story. Personal note: This was a surprise ARC for me as I have never met the author, Pam, but I was intrigued by the book's summary. I was soon immersed in the story, thoroughly enjoyed my time with these characters, and especially appreciated the themes that were similar to my own novel. The publish date is August 2018 - add it to your to-read list so you'll remember!

  25. 5 out of 5

    Jocelyn

    Congrats to author Pam McGaffin on this sweet story of a PNW girl growing up in the 1970s. I appreciated all the NW connections.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Lindsey (Lindseyybooks) Swindlehurst

    I received this as an EARC on net galley for an honest review. I gave this a 3.75/5 stars Im not a huge fan of YA comping of age novels and this one wasn't much different. Although I enjoyed this one more than mosts I feel as though I shouldn't fixate on coming of age novels. Maybe if I continue to try I would change my mind. But that being said just because I didn't love this one doesn't mean you won't either, If you're a bigger fan of them than I am I think you'll really enjoy this one.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Laura ( Latteandbooks )

    I’m not really a fan of historical fiction but being a YA book, I thought that I would give this a try since I read Fawkes and really enjoyed the magic element in that one. This on the other hand had more of an emotional side. It was beautifully written, I was intrigued from the first chapter. It was a little on the slow side but that didn’t bother me to much in this case. This book is set in the late 1060’s and to think that things happened back then is crazy because we really only think of the I’m not really a fan of historical fiction but being a YA book, I thought that I would give this a try since I read Fawkes and really enjoyed the magic element in that one. This on the other hand had more of an emotional side. It was beautifully written, I was intrigued from the first chapter. It was a little on the slow side but that didn’t bother me to much in this case. This book is set in the late 1060’s and to think that things happened back then is crazy because we really only think of the year that we were born and beyond, anything past that is odd. This book goes on Ida’s journey after hearing that her father is presumed to be lost at sea after she over hears a conversation what her mom is having. Her mom and dad have been keeping secrets from her due to this she decides to leave an get the answers that she is looking for. I did have one issue with this book. I didn’t feel connected to Ida until the second half of the book. That being said I still enjoyed it. This kind of reminded me of The Long Way Home Series by Jasinda Wilder when Ava’s husband Christian gets lost at sea.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Stephanie Marie

    For me, this book had its strengths and weaknesses. I initially thought I would really enjoy it because my favorite type of contemporary is one that explores heavier topics, which this book definitely does, but I have a few issues with it. Pros: • Characters - All of the characters, especially Ida, had very complex story arcs and experienced emotions that a reader could sympathize with. Several demographics are also represented, especially in the second half, which I really enjoyed. • Setting - The For me, this book had its strengths and weaknesses. I initially thought I would really enjoy it because my favorite type of contemporary is one that explores heavier topics, which this book definitely does, but I have a few issues with it. Pros: • Characters - All of the characters, especially Ida, had very complex story arcs and experienced emotions that a reader could sympathize with. Several demographics are also represented, especially in the second half, which I really enjoyed. • Setting - The book was set in Washington and Alaska during the 1960s. I haven’t read any other books with a similar backdrop, and I rather enjoyed reading a story in such an unexplored location in YA fiction. • Fishing - I’ve also never read a book with a such a central focus on the fishing industry, which intrigued me from the start. My father has always loved to fish and watches shows about recreational as well as industrial fishing, so I’m familiar with many aspects of it. It was refreshing to read about a topic I have prior knowledge of and rarely find in books of this genre. • Themes - Loss and family are skillfully explored in the book, which I appreciate immensely. Cons: • Motive - Ida’s motive to go to Alaska in search of her father seemed loosely formed and unrealistic to me. When her mother says she doesn’t know if Ida’s father is actually dead, my mind immediately suspected her mother’s words were based on the fact that his body wasn’t found, which makes his death feel less permanent for her. Ida on the other hand jumps to the conclusion that her father abandoned her and her mother in favor of someone else. I just don’t think that’s a sound enough deduction to justify running away from home to go to Alaska in search of information about her father. • Pacing - Several parts of the novel were rather slow, which is why it took such a long time for me to finish. The Leaving Year was a decent read, but since the narrative was based on Ida’s misinterpretation of a conversation and moved along at a sluggish pace, I didn’t enjoy it as much as I hoped I would. I received a free copy through NetGalley in exchange for an honest review.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Tara Austin

  30. 5 out of 5

    Bruce Ramsey

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