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How to Draw Comics the Marvel Way

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One of the first and still one of the best, Stan Lee’s How to Draw Comics the Marvel Way has been the primary resource for any and all who want to master the art of illustrating comic books and graphic novels. Stan Lee, the Mighty Man from Marvel, and John Buscema, active and adventuresome artist behind the Silver Surfer, Conan the Barbarian, the Mighty Thor and Spider-Man, One of the first and still one of the best, Stan Lee’s How to Draw Comics the Marvel Way has been the primary resource for any and all who want to master the art of illustrating comic books and graphic novels. Stan Lee, the Mighty Man from Marvel, and John Buscema, active and adventuresome artist behind the Silver Surfer, Conan the Barbarian, the Mighty Thor and Spider-Man, have collaborated on this comics compendium: an encyclopedia of information for creating your own superhero comic strips. Using artwork from Marvel comics as primary examples, Buscema graphically illustrates the hitherto mysterious methods of comic art. Stan Lee’s pithy prose gives able assistance and advice to the apprentice artist. Bursting with Buscema’s magnificent illustrations and Lee’s laudable word-magic, How to Draw Comics the Marvel Way belongs in the library of everyone who has ever wanted to illustrate his or her own comic strip.


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One of the first and still one of the best, Stan Lee’s How to Draw Comics the Marvel Way has been the primary resource for any and all who want to master the art of illustrating comic books and graphic novels. Stan Lee, the Mighty Man from Marvel, and John Buscema, active and adventuresome artist behind the Silver Surfer, Conan the Barbarian, the Mighty Thor and Spider-Man, One of the first and still one of the best, Stan Lee’s How to Draw Comics the Marvel Way has been the primary resource for any and all who want to master the art of illustrating comic books and graphic novels. Stan Lee, the Mighty Man from Marvel, and John Buscema, active and adventuresome artist behind the Silver Surfer, Conan the Barbarian, the Mighty Thor and Spider-Man, have collaborated on this comics compendium: an encyclopedia of information for creating your own superhero comic strips. Using artwork from Marvel comics as primary examples, Buscema graphically illustrates the hitherto mysterious methods of comic art. Stan Lee’s pithy prose gives able assistance and advice to the apprentice artist. Bursting with Buscema’s magnificent illustrations and Lee’s laudable word-magic, How to Draw Comics the Marvel Way belongs in the library of everyone who has ever wanted to illustrate his or her own comic strip.

30 review for How to Draw Comics the Marvel Way

  1. 5 out of 5

    Greta is Erikasbuddy

    If you are looking for a book that will show you how to draw The Mighty Thor, Spiderman, The Incredible Hulk, or even Captain America's Shield... well, this book isn't that one. It's not a step by step guide on how to draw characters. It's a step by step guide on how to draw THE MARVEL WAY!! And what does that mean? Well, I thought it was going to show me how to draw Spidey and Shellhead, and Cap. But no... IT shows you how to ink, draw action, start with stick figures, where to position, and what If you are looking for a book that will show you how to draw The Mighty Thor, Spiderman, The Incredible Hulk, or even Captain America's Shield... well, this book isn't that one. It's not a step by step guide on how to draw characters. It's a step by step guide on how to draw THE MARVEL WAY!! And what does that mean? Well, I thought it was going to show me how to draw Spidey and Shellhead, and Cap. But no... IT shows you how to ink, draw action, start with stick figures, where to position, and what draws attention. It shows you what artists at Marvel strive to do to make their comic books and panels stand out for the enjoyment of the reader. A very interesting book that I think would be awesome for any kid 13+, it shows you what you need to do to improve at your craft. While, I'm not an artist, it was super fun to go through and see all the techniques. I even drew a stick figure or two. Lately, my son and I have been bonding over superheros and while I don't have the attention-span to draw the Marvel Way.... I know there are boys and girls out there that will eat this book up. A great manual for the artists of tomorrow. Excelsior!! above is the completed picture that my son and I were working on. He drew the majority while I helped with the mouths and hands. We colored and inked together. If you want to bond with your teen, pick up some packing paper and a comic book! Worked wonders for us :)

  2. 4 out of 5

    Meredith

    This is a very good little figure drawing book. I teach art in high school and have had all sorts of students buy it after seeing it in my class, but it would be appropriate for kids from late elementary up. I keep several copies of it out on TAKS testing days and kids with little to no drawing experience will happily follow the step by step to draw Spidey, but is is not just a step to step book. There is real, accurate, and practical advice about how to master the figure for more serious beginn This is a very good little figure drawing book. I teach art in high school and have had all sorts of students buy it after seeing it in my class, but it would be appropriate for kids from late elementary up. I keep several copies of it out on TAKS testing days and kids with little to no drawing experience will happily follow the step by step to draw Spidey, but is is not just a step to step book. There is real, accurate, and practical advice about how to master the figure for more serious beginners. My first figure drawing prof in college recommended this book to college level beginners. I have not found a better $13 figure drawing book - though it used to be $7. Most libraries have it and I can usually find a few copies at the used book store. Written for beginners where some of the later marvel drawing books assume you know a good deal. Much more content than most of the manga drawing books.

  3. 5 out of 5

    J.G. Keely

    Classic instruction which started many artists on that long path (I bought a used copy, myself, as a child). Combine with a little Loomis, Hogarth, and some figure drawing and you are on your way to being a real talent. This is pretty much an introduction to the Marvel 'house style' at the time, but certainly still applicable. My Suggested Readings in Comics

  4. 4 out of 5

    Johnny Atomic

    When I was young, every little boy I knew wanted to draw comics (these days many little girls do too, and that’s awesome) but I had a serious advantage over all of them. I was the only kid on my block with a copy of How to Draw Comics the Marvel Way It is nearly impossible to write a book that touches upon all the essential aspects of a given art field in any relevant way. Yet, somehow Stan Lee brings us just that. It doesn’t stop with proper tools, formulas, and methods. It even approaches profe When I was young, every little boy I knew wanted to draw comics (these days many little girls do too, and that’s awesome) but I had a serious advantage over all of them. I was the only kid on my block with a copy of How to Draw Comics the Marvel Way It is nearly impossible to write a book that touches upon all the essential aspects of a given art field in any relevant way. Yet, somehow Stan Lee brings us just that. It doesn’t stop with proper tools, formulas, and methods. It even approaches professionalism and best practices. All of this without going over your head, or talking down to the audience. The coolest thing about HTDCTMW is It’s really a book about visual story telling that happens to use the comic book idiom. Pacing, mood, dynamism, framing, composition, it’s all there along with a glossary of industry terms, list of materials and constructive anatomy methods, that are still as relevant today as they were in 1977. If you have children or young relatives who show the spark of talent for the entertainment art fields of story boarding, concept art/design, or sequential art of any kind, this is the book for them. If you want to pick up a book of sound advice and technique basics, over and over again and just be reminded of how fun illustration really is, this book is for you. Notes: With regard to anatomy; this book only deals with idealized figure construction, but that’s fine because it was intended for a young audience that might find life drawing techniques both confining and tedious. It is just a primer, after all. HTDCTMW is not perfect, but it is perfect at what it does.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Manveer

    Was kinda surprised to bump into this book on GR while adding comics. I remember reading this, or rather looking through it when I was a little kid. Almost eight years ago. The thing is, I was a creative bastard back then. I used to draw stuff, build stuff, do stuff. I had tons of weird hobbies that I really really miss now. A lonely awkward kid living in a world of his own imagination. Life used to be good. God, I wanna relive those days. This book brought back memories of those days. Reminded m Was kinda surprised to bump into this book on GR while adding comics. I remember reading this, or rather looking through it when I was a little kid. Almost eight years ago. The thing is, I was a creative bastard back then. I used to draw stuff, build stuff, do stuff. I had tons of weird hobbies that I really really miss now. A lonely awkward kid living in a world of his own imagination. Life used to be good. God, I wanna relive those days. This book brought back memories of those days. Reminded me that I actually used to draw. I do remember loving this book. I even created a couple of my own comic strips. Might have been pathetic, but the fact the I created them cheers me up. I should have the superheros I tried drawing lying somewhere around at home. So here's a generous five stars, if only for the nostalgic feels.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Jamest.

    As long as I can recall, I always loved art. As a child and teenager my favorite art was the comic book. I devoured them! As I could draw a little I thought becoming a comic book arist would be the greatest. I picked up this volume and found it to be a pretty good book on a lot of drawing essentials. It really taught me a lot about figure drawing in particular. Sure some of the prose is bombastic in typical Stan Lee style, but the lessons in the book are clear, concise, and important principles. As long as I can recall, I always loved art. As a child and teenager my favorite art was the comic book. I devoured them! As I could draw a little I thought becoming a comic book arist would be the greatest. I picked up this volume and found it to be a pretty good book on a lot of drawing essentials. It really taught me a lot about figure drawing in particular. Sure some of the prose is bombastic in typical Stan Lee style, but the lessons in the book are clear, concise, and important principles. Eventually my style changed and I moved away from comic book art. However you can still see the influence of comic books and this guide in my work today. I still believe that artists working in comics are some of the finest around: the imagination needed to fill panel after panel, the sheer volume of the work they must produce, and the ability to tale a compelling story through drawing alone. All that makes me rank them with the best!

  7. 5 out of 5

    Eric

    For good or ill, this book taught me how to draw figures. Over the years I kept going back to it and trying again, getting farther and gaining confidence. We'll see if it ever culminates in an actual printed comic of my own :) I'm sure it will, even if I'm 80 years old, sitting on the back porch, still holding onto the dream.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Steven

    I loved and devoured this book when I was a kid (in the original edition). Alas, my drawing skills never quite developed and I put more energy into the stories than into the drawings. Still, it was a step on the path to making me an author, and I still think Buscema was one of the strongest draftsmen Marvel ever had.

  9. 5 out of 5

    J.M. Giovine

    Obviously, this isn't a lecture as well, more like a practicing-tip guide for the comicbook artist to develop and improve the talent, getting the way that Marvel does it's work (at least, in the golden years) and it's narrated by Stan Lee himself. It doesn't get any better than that.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Paul Smith

    This book is great for those that want to learn more about creating comics. All of the techniques are presented in a straight forward manner and is easy to understand for those, like myself, who are not artistically inclined.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Bee

    Easily the best How to Draw book I've read. Lays everything out in an easy to digest manner... And back in the 90s when I read it, you really could see the difference with the Marvel style (not so much now though)

  12. 4 out of 5

    Bill

    When I was in seventh grade, I studied this book from cover to cover and improved my drawing and visual storytelling skills dramatically. It was great then and remains so- John Buscema was an absolutely brilliant comics artist.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Matt

    In my copy, a figure drawing of Sue Reed is covered in a grisly patchwork of crayon scribbles of clashing colors, and an action sketch of Spiderman delivering a punch is captioned "soprmarn" in a semiliterate scrawl.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Stephen Theaker

    This got me drawing again for the first time since primary school, mainly by pointing out a few basic things I'd somehow never known - for one thing that drawings are things you can build, rather than just putting pencil to paper and creating masterpieces on the spot.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Beth

    I'll come back to this one day - 3* I would never have bought myself this book but my mam got it for me and I couldn't leave it so I had to have a go. I'm definitely better at drawing because of this book but it is so time-consuming and I honestly don't gave the time for this. I really don't - balancing two jobs is hard enough! I'm annoyed that Black Widow's not there because really I wanted to draw her as part of my gift for a birthday present for a friend but I can't and I don't even have the sk I'll come back to this one day - 3* I would never have bought myself this book but my mam got it for me and I couldn't leave it so I had to have a go. I'm definitely better at drawing because of this book but it is so time-consuming and I honestly don't gave the time for this. I really don't - balancing two jobs is hard enough! I'm annoyed that Black Widow's not there because really I wanted to draw her as part of my gift for a birthday present for a friend but I can't and I don't even have the skills to do it. This book jumps from step 1-9 and for a novice (like myself), its too hard. I don't have any skills and this book doesn't take that into account. So yeah. A little annoyed and frustrated.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Nicole

    A great, classic “how to draw” book. Definitely for beginners, but there are handy, comic book specific tips for artists to utilize, too. Worth having for classic drawing techniques explained in a fun and simple way.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Alex Berg

    Pretty dated, and quite superficial in most of the topics covered, but still has some good information for beginners.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Maik Krüger

    All you'll ever need as an artist. Basically my bible.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Lindsey.parks

    Everything.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Nathan Conama

    good book

  21. 4 out of 5

    Russell Mark Olson

    This is an absolute classic. I was tempted to give it 3.5 stars, but that would be merely for the tone and not the content and that doesn't seem fair. Stan Lee is overly sanguine, but then, that's Stan Lee and it wouldn't be The Marvel Way without a bet of Lee's effervescence. The reason the sanguinity seems out of place is for the fact that drawing comics is hard and takes thousands of hours of practice and when I read this book as an eleven-year-old, my impression was that anyone, with the rig This is an absolute classic. I was tempted to give it 3.5 stars, but that would be merely for the tone and not the content and that doesn't seem fair. Stan Lee is overly sanguine, but then, that's Stan Lee and it wouldn't be The Marvel Way without a bet of Lee's effervescence. The reason the sanguinity seems out of place is for the fact that drawing comics is hard and takes thousands of hours of practice and when I read this book as an eleven-year-old, my impression was that anyone, with the right materials and the right reference books could sit down and whip up a comic in no time. To give him credit, Lee does reiterate the point that becoming a cartoonist takes practice, time and sweat...but it would have been nice if he had sat down with me as an eleven-year-old and said "You can do it, but don't expect it to be easy and don't think you're going to have to go to some very dark places before you'll start to see the light." With regards to the content of the book, you couldn't have a better guide. Now, there are portions of the book which are a bit pointless, and I won't sugar coat those. If you want to learn how to draw the figure, get into a life drawing class, pick up some academics texts on the subject, and draw the hell out of about three dozen sketch books. But what this book does do is to give you a better idea of dynamics, composition, and storytelling. It's not a final point to drawing comics, Eisner's Sequential texts are certainly more comprehensive and give you a better sense of the philosophy behind comics, but this book is meat and potatoes, and sometimes that's what you want. There's also nothing better than Marvel's 60-70s bullpen. Those guys knew how to draw and that's what makes this book so outstanding, Buscema chooses some excellent examples to study from and the pencil work is stunning. This book, although intended for initiates is better suited to people who have been working with panels for a few years and need a boost, a refresher, and a bit of Marvel pizazz. Glad I picked it back up after 20 years.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Lisa Feld

    When I was a kid, this was really the only book available on how to draw superhero comics: the muscular physiology and combat poses, the foreshortening that makes skyscrapers or alien landscapes recede convincingly into the distance (or human beings move in three dimensions instead of kicking or punching straight out to the side), the camera angles that added intensity to different moments, and the tools and terms of the comics industry. It remains a clear, concise guide to the basics. But it's i When I was a kid, this was really the only book available on how to draw superhero comics: the muscular physiology and combat poses, the foreshortening that makes skyscrapers or alien landscapes recede convincingly into the distance (or human beings move in three dimensions instead of kicking or punching straight out to the side), the camera angles that added intensity to different moments, and the tools and terms of the comics industry. It remains a clear, concise guide to the basics. But it's interesting rereading this and Scott McCloud's Making Comics or Will Eisner's Comics and Sequential Art back to back, because it HtDCtMW does exactly what the title suggests: it teaches you how to draw in the Kirby-esque house style of late-seventies Marvel Comics without discussing (and in some cases actually discouraging experimentation with) other ways to draw comics. One example: Stan Lee says that changing the camera angle will add tension, but doesn't say whether there's an emotional difference between looking down on a scene or looking up at the characters from below, and he doesn't say whether there are times when changing the camera angle too much can be confusing or distracting. Another: There are several pages specifying the one correct way to draw women's mouths, eyes, and noses (with examples of what "wrong" features look like), which doesn't allow for different personalities or more diverse character design. If you need to distinguish between women characters, better hope they have different hairstyles. But aside from my own history learning to draw by trying the examples and challenges in HtDCtMW, it was really the first of its kind and kicked off important discussions about what comics could do and what constituted doing them well. That earns it high marks from me.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Sarah

    Genre: how-to Intended audience: artists, aspiring artists, and comic lovers alike, ages 8+ Age range: realistically appropriate for readers ages 10+ Summary: In Chapter 1, Stan Lee and John Buscema provide lists of supplies and materials, and important vocabulary terms and techniques, necessary to draw one's own comics using the trademark Marvel style. Chapters 2-12 delve into technique, offering details about drawing with perspective, shaping bodies and heads, inking, cover art, page layouts, and Genre: how-to Intended audience: artists, aspiring artists, and comic lovers alike, ages 8+ Age range: realistically appropriate for readers ages 10+ Summary: In Chapter 1, Stan Lee and John Buscema provide lists of supplies and materials, and important vocabulary terms and techniques, necessary to draw one's own comics using the trademark Marvel style. Chapters 2-12 delve into technique, offering details about drawing with perspective, shaping bodies and heads, inking, cover art, page layouts, and other aspects of creating comics. Written instructions are cheeky and comic-esque, and are paired with visuals, often provided step-by-step. Personal Response: The most admirable aspect of this how-to is that the techniques it details apply to pretty much any artistic style, not just comic books. Form, perspective, figures, action, composition, and color, are general artistic elements that, once learned, can be found and used all throughout the art world. Stan Lee and John Buscema are thorough instructors, first informing readers about what form and perspective are, then providing detailed steps of how to draw forms in and create perspective, all while using basic examples like lamps, cars, and airplanes. It is admirable that they don't just give comic book scenes for kids to copy from; students who read this manual from cover to cover will come away with valuable artistic knowledge (maybe even skills) that they can use to be creative themselves.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Javier

    After reading The New Drawing on the Right Side of the Brain and practising my new skills copying several portraits, I wanted to get introduced in the art of drawing from imagination. So, I looked in a few forums on the Internet and this book kept appearing here and there. There isn't a more fanciful reason for my choice, I'm afraid. The book didn't fulfil my approach for two reasons. The first one is that the book isn't very much for beginners. It does explain a bit about drawing the human figur After reading The New Drawing on the Right Side of the Brain and practising my new skills copying several portraits, I wanted to get introduced in the art of drawing from imagination. So, I looked in a few forums on the Internet and this book kept appearing here and there. There isn't a more fanciful reason for my choice, I'm afraid. The book didn't fulfil my approach for two reasons. The first one is that the book isn't very much for beginners. It does explain a bit about drawing the human figure, faces, composition and many other things, but it looks more like a reminder than a guide for beginners. The final chapter about inking was more about using darker areas to emphasize the composition and "adding drama" to the scene rather than explaining the actual techniques, and again, every reference of techniques were more of a reminder than anything. The second reason is my fault. This book is about drawing comics, and I might have some interest on the topic, but I wanted to learn how to draw from imagination first. There's tons of information about how to exaggerate the figure, how to use that angle instead of that one... But not a very good book for just drawing for the sake of it. Summarizing, this book, although enjoyable, didn't help me as it isn't suited for beginners.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Michael Neno

    It's funny (but not surprising) that How To Draw Comics the Marvel Way is marketed as being by Stan Lee and John Buscema when it's really John Buscema's art lesson all the way (it'd be like Marvel publishing a book called How To Write Comics the Marvel Way by John Buscema and Stan Lee). In any event, the book is useful for aspiring cartoonists - probably more useful now than when it was originally published in 1978, since many recent mainstream cartoonists seem to have difficulty with simple, cle It's funny (but not surprising) that How To Draw Comics the Marvel Way is marketed as being by Stan Lee and John Buscema when it's really John Buscema's art lesson all the way (it'd be like Marvel publishing a book called How To Write Comics the Marvel Way by John Buscema and Stan Lee). In any event, the book is useful for aspiring cartoonists - probably more useful now than when it was originally published in 1978, since many recent mainstream cartoonists seem to have difficulty with simple, clear storytelling. Buscema covers many of the ground level basics: art tools, camera shots and panel compositions, the building blocks of animate and inanimate objects, perspective, penciling and inking. In one crucial section, he covers how to tell stories dramatically via changing camera angles and body language - something film directors would also find useful. This book has been derided for decades by those (mainly indie cartoonists) who argue that drawing comics the Marvel way isn't the only way. Of course it isn't. No one is suggesting Kirbyesque dynamism is appropriate for intimate or whimsical autobiographical stories. For those wanting a career in mainstream comics, especially for those who find photographic realism unappealing or an artistic dead end, How To Draw Comics the Marvel Way has a lot to teach.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Sgt Roman Hunter

    GREAT BOOK. WHEN I FIRST GOT IT AND ONE SIMILAR TO IT OVER 30 YEARS AGO ALL I DREW WERE GIRLS, THEN ALL MY FRIENDS KEPT PUSHING ME TO DRAW FROM THE BOOK, SO I MADE EVERYTHING BIGGER AND BETTER, MORE MUSCLE, BIGGER BREAST, WHEN I WENT TO MARVEL, AS A KID, I GOT TURNED DOWN 3 TIMES BY THAT GUY THAT GOT FIRED LATER ON,,, JIM SHOOTER. LATER I LEARNED THAT EVERYONE WAS COPYING MY ART. I SAW NEW GUYS LIKE JIM LEE, WILCE PORTACIO, TODD McFARLANE, AND ALL THOSE GUYS FROM IMAGE AND VALIANT COMICS DRAWING GREAT BOOK. WHEN I FIRST GOT IT AND ONE SIMILAR TO IT OVER 30 YEARS AGO ALL I DREW WERE GIRLS, THEN ALL MY FRIENDS KEPT PUSHING ME TO DRAW FROM THE BOOK, SO I MADE EVERYTHING BIGGER AND BETTER, MORE MUSCLE, BIGGER BREAST, WHEN I WENT TO MARVEL, AS A KID, I GOT TURNED DOWN 3 TIMES BY THAT GUY THAT GOT FIRED LATER ON,,, JIM SHOOTER. LATER I LEARNED THAT EVERYONE WAS COPYING MY ART. I SAW NEW GUYS LIKE JIM LEE, WILCE PORTACIO, TODD McFARLANE, AND ALL THOSE GUYS FROM IMAGE AND VALIANT COMICS DRAWING LIKE ME, IT WAS THEN THAT I REALIZED, MARVEL WASN'T READY FOR MY ART, BUT THE GUY THAT TURNED ME DOWN GAVE MY IDEA TO ALL THOSE GUYS,,, LIFE SUCKS, BUT THEN YOU GROW UP. I HAD TO LEARN MY LESSON THE HARD WAY.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Mark

    Seriously, one of the best how-to books on drawing (not just drawing comics) ever published. Looking past the overblown prose of co-author Stan Lee, the interested reader finds clear, pragmatic, and useful advice on all aspects of cartooning, from materials and lettering to panel composition and figure drawing. The text is illustrated with examples from many of the Marvel “bullpen” artists, but the best lessons come from co-author John Buscema, one of the underrated masters of graphic narrative. Seriously, one of the best how-to books on drawing (not just drawing comics) ever published. Looking past the overblown prose of co-author Stan Lee, the interested reader finds clear, pragmatic, and useful advice on all aspects of cartooning, from materials and lettering to panel composition and figure drawing. The text is illustrated with examples from many of the Marvel “bullpen” artists, but the best lessons come from co-author John Buscema, one of the underrated masters of graphic narrative. In my teens, when I was ill-advisedly considering a career as a superhero comic artist, I devoured this book; looking back on its dog-eared pages today, it still stands as an exemplar of instruction.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Cullen

    I wanted to be an artist as a kid, and I have folder after folder of my haphazardly drawn monsters and spaceships and superheroes. This book was my ultimate reference work, and I carried the old blue hardback (the cover had been lost early on) around with me everywhere. While I never attained my goal of comic artistry, I still have a copy (now paperback) of the book on my shelf. It's a nice resource for anyone interested in comics, whether you can draw like John Romita ... or if stick figures ar I wanted to be an artist as a kid, and I have folder after folder of my haphazardly drawn monsters and spaceships and superheroes. This book was my ultimate reference work, and I carried the old blue hardback (the cover had been lost early on) around with me everywhere. While I never attained my goal of comic artistry, I still have a copy (now paperback) of the book on my shelf. It's a nice resource for anyone interested in comics, whether you can draw like John Romita ... or if stick figures are your cup of tea.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Thomas Cardin

    I lost my copy of this a few years ago. I really need to order a new one. If you put this book in the hands of a kid as well as a sketchbook and a pencil--they are gonna start drawing! There REALLY IS a Marvel Way. There are other ways to draw comics, of course, but I found the Marvel Way very inspiring. This book, in combination with a good figure drawing and anatomy book will go a long way toward providing excellent fundamentals for the artist.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Joshua

    Art was my second least favorite class in elementary school, beyond P.E., naturally. Then I checked this out, and it taught this math nerd (well, math nerd at the time) how to draw objects and people as forms based on cylinders, spheres, and cubes, not just their outline. I felt like it changed me overnight. As silly as it sounds, this book—along with Ed Emberley’s “Make a World”—changed my life when I was eleven.

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